Kievlianin

Kievlianin

 

a reactionary-monarchist newspaper published in Kiev from 1864 to 1919; it came out three times a week until 1879 and then daily. The newspaper reflected the interests of Russian landowners in the Ukraine and was subsidized by the tsarist government. The historian V. Ia. Shul’gin was the founder of the paper. D. I. Pikhno, economist and professor of the University of Kiev, who later headed the Kiev section of the Black Hundreds’ League of the Russian People, became the editor of Kievlianin in 1878. The publication of Kievlianin was interrupted in January 1918 but was resumed during the Denikin occupation of Kiev from August to December 1919, under the editorship of V. V. Shul’gin.

References in periodicals archive ?
The conservative newspaper Kievlianin argued, "We do not see any reasonable foundation for the attempts to necessarily distinguish, even in the alphabet, Little Russians from Great Russians and for the attempts to impose a universal literary quality on a language of which every parish has its own dialect." (17) This motif, with variations, proved to be very persistent.
Such publicized acts of Jewish "fanaticism" prompted the conservative newspaper Kievlianin in 1884 to call for greater legal protections for married Jewish women who converted and sought to marry Orthodox men, but whose Jewish husbands refused to grant them divorces in order to free them.
Stories of gendered Jewish violence in the popular press, especially prominent in conservative newspapers like Kievlianin, were thus influenced by reform-era developments, including not only the Polish uprising of 1863, but also the judicial reform and the abolition of cantonist units.
Pikhno (editor of Kievlianin from 1879 to 1913) and M.
Anyone who has read the newspaper Kievlianin knows that this conservative and allegedly Russifying organ continually celebrated local particularity and published the work of leading Ukrainophiles such as Drahomanov or P.
Nonetheless, in April 1881, Fadeev argued in a letter to Ivan Aksakov that in Russia, suggestions for reform became popular "only as a result of a press debate." (22) A few years later, in 1884, Witte would use the pages of Kievlianin to defend Fadeev's honor (he died in 1883) from Suvorin's Novoe vremia, which had accused the deceased of "writing to order" throughout his career.
In the process of debating his policies with Dmitrii Ivanovich Pikhno, the editor of the newspaper Kievlianin, Witte learned how to explain complex matters in accessible language and took part in founding the newspaper Kievskoe slovo, which articulated a conservative and protectionist economic program.
Vladimir's, launched the historical journal Kievlianin, which celebrated the cultural peculiarities of "southern Russia" as well as the role the region had played in defending the Russian Empire from Catholic incursions.
(63) Consistent with the pattern we have seen earlier, Iuzefovich insisted that the planning must be a "truly popular matter." While Kievlianin admiringly reviewed popular histories of Khmel'nitsldi's campaigns--quoting Mikeshin's "folksong" in one article (64)--committee members worked to "compile a short but very clear note about Khmel'nitskii's meaning for Russian history" and circulated appeals for funding that welcomed "donations of a few cents from simple people." (65)
Savenko (the key writer of Kievlianin), Mikhail Mikhailovich Perovskii-Petrovo-Solovovo, and A.
As one letter to the nationalist Kievlianin said of wartime assistance, "there could be no second opinion" on helping soldiers' families--this was part of the "common civic obligation" (obshchegrazhdanskaia povinnost').
Shelokhaev (Moscow: ROSSPEN, 1999), 283-92; and Kievlianin, 22 August 1914: 4.