Kievskaia Starina

Kievskaia Starina

 

(Kievan Antiquity), a historical journal of a bourgeois-liberal tendency that was published monthly in Kiev, in Russian, from 1882 to 1906. The historian F. G. Lebedintsev was the founder and the first editor. Kievskaia starina published articles on the history, archaeology, ethnography, geography, and literature of the Ukraine and documents on prominent figures of Ukrainian culture (such as G. S. Skovoroda, I. P. Kotliarevskii, and T. G. Shevchenko). In the late 1890’s the journal began to publish works by Ukrainian writers such as I. Franko, M. Kotsiubinskii, Lesia Ukrainka, and Panas Mirnyi. V. B. Antonovich, D. I. Bagalei, P. S. Efimenko, and A. Ia. Efimenko wrote for the journal. Kievskaia starina was published in 1907 in Ukrainian under the name Ukraina (Ukraine).

REFERENCES

Sistematicheskii ukazatel’zhurnala “Kievskaia starina” (1882–1906). Poltava, 1911.
Lazarevs’kyi, H. “Kyivs’ka starovyna (Spogady).” Ukrains’ka literatura, 1943, nos. 7–12, 1944, nos. 1–10.
References in periodicals archive ?
The same can be said for Kievskaia starina, the local history journal that is generally regarded as a Ukrainophile organ.
For Ukrainian sermons see Nikolai Sumtsov, "Ioanikii Galiatovskii (k istorii iuzhno-russkoi literatury XVII veka)," in Kievskaia starina, vol.
(52.) Nikolai Sumtsov, "Innokentii Gizel' (k istorii iuzhno-russkoi literatury XVII veka)," Kievskaia starina, vol.
One could spend a lifetime reading the entire collections of Russkaia starina, Kievskaia starina, Russkii vestnik, Istoricheskii vestnik, and so on.
Iuzefovichu (1843-1861 g.g.)," Kievskaia starina 64, 2 (1899): 185-208.
(30) See "Avtobiograficheskaia zametka," in Mykhailo Petrovych Drahomanov: Literaturno publitsystychni pratsi (Kyiv: Naukova dumka, 1970), 1:40-45; Boris P--skii, "Vospominanie iz nedalekogo proshlogo," Kievskaia starina 11, 2 (1885): 235-67; V.
Petersburg journal Kievskaia starina. He faulted the dictionary for having designated only the speech used in southern Little Russia, Galicia, and Bukovina as Little Russian, thereby excluding speakers from northern Little Russia (the regions south of Minsk; the province of Grodno; and the speech of Siedlce and Lublin).
Shakhmatov, Otzyv o slovare ukrainskogo zhurnala "Kievskaia starina" (St.