Kikimora


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Kikimora

 

(also, shishimora or mara), in Russian folk superstitions, a tiny invisible female character, with a head the size of a thimble and a body as thin as a straw. A kikimora lives in a house behind the oven and spins and weaves.

In popular speech, a kikimora is an untidy or unattractively dressed woman.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sharpe, 1980); Pryde, Environmental Management in the Soviet Union (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991); Murray Feshbach and Alfred Friendly, Ecocide in the USSR: Health and Nature under- Siege (New York: Basic Books, 1992); Ann-Mari Satre Ahlander, Environmental Problems in the Shortage Economy: 'Ihe Legacy of Soviet Environmental Policy (Brookfield, VT: Edward Elgar, 1994); Feshbach, Ecological Disaster: Cleaning Up the Hidden Legacy of the Soviet Regime (New York: Twentieth Century Fund Press, 1995); Oleg Yanitsky, Russian Greens in a Risk Society: A Structural Analysis (Helsinki: Kikimora Publications, 2000); and Josephson, ed.
Beautiful too was Liadov's delightful miniature Kikimora, an elvish scherzo of Mendelssohnian grace and wit but with a distinctly Russian accent, which opened the concert.
According to Hess, in addition to the Teatro Real season, the 1916 tour included performances in late August in San Sebastian of Las meninas and Kikimora and in Bilbao of Las meninas (303).
For an overview of methods of evaluating the implementation of international treaties and on the expansion of the use of peer review, see in particular Merja Norros, Judicial Cooperation in Civil Matters with Russia and Methods of Evaluation (Helsinki: Kikimora Publications, 2010).
University of Helsinki, Aleksanteri Institute, Kikimora Publications: Helsinki, Finland.
Peca, Sutela (1998), The Road to the Russian Market Economy: Selected Essays, 1993-1998, Kikimora Publications, Helsinki, 1998.
Oppositions within the Finnish Communist Party in Soviet Russia 1918-1935, Helsinki: Kikimora Publications, 2003, pp135-7, 253309.
Julian's weaved his music, set to lyrics by Berlie Doherty, around three classical pieces conjuring up witches, magic and death: Danse Macabre by Camille Saint Saens, Kikimora and The Enchanted Lake by Anatol Liadov and Sorcerer's Apprentice by Paul Dukas.
See Maija Turunen, Faith in the Heart of Bussia: The Beligiosity of PostSoviet University Students (Saarijarvi: Kikimora, 2005), 129-33.
21 Leginska, Ethel Six Nursery Rhymes for Soprano and 2/5/1928 Small Orchestra Leginska, Ethel Triptich for Eleven Instruments 4/29/1928 Leoncavallo "Ballatella" from Pagliacci 1/18/1927 Leoncavallo "Ballatella" from Pagliacci 11/13/1929 Leoncavallo "Ballatella" from Pagliacci 12/15/1930 Liadov Kikimora, Legend for Orchestra, op.
Christopher Morley St Petersburg Philharmonic Symphony Hall Liadov's magical scamperings in his Kikimora were very appropriate for this year's Hallowee'n, inspired as it was by a legendary witch.
Markku Kivinen and Katri Pynnrniemi (Helsinki: Kikimora Publications, 2002), 22.