Kikuyu


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Kikuyu

(kĭko͞o`yo͞o), Bantu-speaking people, numbering about 6 million, forming the largest tribal group in Kenya. The Kikuyu live in the highlands NE of Nairobi. Before the British conquest they were the most influential people in the country. During the 1950s, under the leadership of Jomo KenyattaKenyatta, Jomo
, 1893?–1978, African political leader, first president of Kenya (1964–78). A Kikuyu, he was one of the earliest and best-known African nationalist leaders.
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, the Kikuyu fought the British colonialists in what was known as the Mau Mau Emergency. Although the Kikuyu traditionally lived in separate family homesteads, most were moved into villages during the rebellion. After the removal of the colonists, a large number chose to remain in the villages. The Kikuyu economy centers mainly around agriculture, with little or no hunting or fishing.

Bibliography

See H. E. Lambert, Kikuyu Social and Political Institutions (1956, repr. 1965); R. M. Gatheru, Child of Two Worlds (1964, repr. 1972); J. Davison, Voices from Mutira (1989).

Kikuyu

 

(Akikuyu, Giguyu), a people inhabiting central Kenya. They number 2.2 million (1969, census) and speak the Kikuyu language. The Meru (554,000), Embu (118,000), and Mbere (49,000) are related to the Kikuyu in language and culture. According to legend the Kikuyu came from the east (northeast of the Tan River) about the 16th century. Christianity is widespread, along with traditional beliefs. The Kikuyu are mainly agriculturalists, raising coffee for export. A working class is emerging, and the ranks of the national bourgeoisie and intelligentsia are growing.

REFERENCES

Middleton, J. The Central Tribes of the North-Eastern Bantu (The Kikuyu . . . ). London, 1953.
Kenyatta, J. Facing Mount Kenya. New York, 1962.

Kikuyu

 

(Giguyu), the language of the Kikuyu people of central Kenya. Kikuyu, a Bantu language, is spoken by 2.7 million people (1970, estimate). The phonetic system is characterized by interdental consonants: voiced ð and voiceless λ; the Dahl law of the dissimilation of consonants is applicable to Kikuyu. A characteristic morphological feature is the relatively complete system of nominal classes (16). The class prefixes are monosyllabic. In addition to the three conventional locative classes with the prefixes pa-, ku-, and mu-, the locative prefix e- is used. Word order is subject-predicate-object, and class agreement is strictly observed at the syntactic level.

REFERENCES

Doke, C. M. Bantu: Modern Grammatical, Phonetical and Lexicographical Studies Since 1860. London, 1945.
Armstrong, L. Phonetic and Tonal Structure of Kikuyu. London, 1940.
Gecaga, B. M., and W. H. Kirkaldy-Willis. English-Kikuyu and Kikuyu-English Vocabulary. Nairobi-Kampala, 1956.
References in periodicals archive ?
The song had references to The Hague cases and was also used as a rallying point for Kikuyu unity.
The words of Dr Elkins about the government policy that 'only by detaining nearly the entire Kikuyu population of 1.5 million people and physically and psychologically atomising its men, women and children could colonial authority be restored and the civilizing mission reinstated' should give us chills.
From the Kikuyu perspective, there is no obvious successor who can convincingly pick up where Kenyatta left off.
A national youth employment programme, for example, exists only on the Kikuyu side of the bridge.
At each labelling period, replicates of 15 cores (kikuyu) and 12 cores (Rhodes grass) were labelled for 1.5h on three consecutive weeks during a re-growth phase to enable a more even labelling of plant-derived C.
On June 17, 1913, some sixty representatives of Protestant missionary societies met at the Church of Scotland mission at Kikuyu, not far from Nairobi, Kenya.
but, historically, every time the Luo and the Kikuyu have been on different sides there has been violence," said Mzalendo Kibunjia, who heads a national agency formed to reconcile tribes after the violence.
The Independent Review Commission (IREC), whose role it is to investigate the entire electoral process of last year's election, states in its report that Kibaki was "drawing his support mainly from the Kikuyu, Embu, and Meru communities," while Odinga had the support of the "Luo, Luhya, Kalenjin, and some smaller ethnic communities." In light of the importance of ethnicity in the development of Kenyan politics, information about candidates' ethnic support is particularly relevant.
In the Rift Valley, a crowd of Luos demanded a man's ID card, determined from his name he was Kikuyu and killed him.