Kill Van Kull


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Kill Van Kull

(kĭl văn kŭl), channel, 4 mi (6.4 km) long and .5 mi (.8 km) wide, connecting Upper New York Bay with Newark Bay, between Bayonne, N.J., and Staten Island, N.Y. It is the main route for ships docking at the busy harbors of Port Elizabeth and Port Newark, N.J. Bayonne Bridge (1931; 1,652 ft/504 m long), the second longest steel-arch bridge in the United States, spans the channel.
References in periodicals archive ?
A luxury yacht tour by Classic Harbor Line of Staten Island's Kill Van Kull and Freshkills Park waterways;
Spanning the Kill Van Kull tidal strait and first opened in1931, the Bayonne Bridge was the longest in the world until 1978.
The exact route through Bayonne has not been decided but an option favored by the company would enter Bayonne from the Kill Van Kull at the Texaco-Chevron site to the west of Bayonne Bridge.
One day last December, the station received a call from police officers that a person had fallen into the Kill van Kull, a tidal strait separating Staten Island from Bayonne, New Jersey.
The study area is comprised of approximately six miles of shoreline along the Kill van Kull and includes the neighborhoods of Mariner's Harbor, Arlington, Port Richmond, Elm Park, West Brighton, Livingston, New Brighton and St.
Intermodal improvements at the Port Newark/Elizabeth Marine Complex, and continued dredging of the Kill van Kull.
The Arthur Kill Channel 41-foot navigation project spans the New York/New Jersey Harbor from the confluence of the Kill Van Kull and Newark Bay Channels to the New York Container Terminal in Staten Island and is an important link in the harbor estuary system.
In Bayonne, the Gebroe-Hammer team of Callahan and Alan Lieberman, vice president, handled the bulk sale of 17 condominium units within a converted four-story building located near the Kill Van Kull channel in Bayonne, NJ.
The STCC suit charges that STCC illegally stored 750,000 gallons of hazardous waste on a barge in the Kill Van Kull, took inadequate steps to prevent spills of oil into the Kill Van Kull and stored and burned oil with an excessive sulfur content in steam-producing boilers.
Army Corps of Engineers and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey today announced the award of a $79 million project to deepen the Kill Van Kull federal channel in the Port of New York and New Jersey to 50 feet.
It will provide Staten Island residents with water front access and outstanding views of ship traffic traveling along the Kill van Kull.