Kilmainham Treaty


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Kilmainham Treaty

 

an agreement reached in 1882 between the British Liberal government of W. Gladstone and the leader of the Irish Home Rule party, C. Parnell, who was in the Kilmainham jail (near Dublin). For certain concessions obtained from the government, Parnell pledged to use his influence to end agrarian disturbances. The British government released Irish leaders from prison and replaced the most odious colonial officials. The Kilmainham Treaty marked the turning of the bourgeois Home Rule supporters away from alliance with the peasant masses toward a policy of accommodation with the British ruling circles.

References in periodicals archive ?
He shows how Parnell tended to tone down his earlier anti-imperial rhetoric in Parliament once Gladstone was in power, and especially so after the Kilmainham Treaty freed him to focus on the political objective of building the Irish Parliament Party into a powerful third force that could decisively move the legislative agenda at Westminster towards Home Rule.
The author of this biography begins with the important reminder that Michael Davitt was not yet forty when the Kilmainham Treaty was signed (11).
The Fenians both in Ireland and America had disliked the Kilmainham Treaty and might have quit the coalition, but were embarrassed by their connections with the Invincibles.
For conservative nationalists, the Land Act of 1881 and the "Kilmainham Treaty" of May 1882 between Parnell and Gladstone was a fair settlement and hence forth they wanted Irish-American power and influence to be used exclusively to achieve Home Rule.