Kim Philby


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Philby, Kim

(Harold Adrian Russell Philby), 1912–88, British double agent, son of Harry St. John Bridger PhilbyPhilby, Harry St. John Bridger,
1885–1960, British explorer, official, and author. He joined (1917) the British foreign service, was sent on a special mission to Arabia, and became the first European to visit the southern provinces of the Nejd.
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, studied Trinity College, Cambridge. A longtime high-ranking member of Britain's MI6 intelligence agency, his positions included head of the anti-Soviet section and later chief liaison between the British and American intelligence services. During his time at British intelligence, Philby worked as a Soviet spy. He came under suspicion when two of his close associates, Donald Maclean and Guy Burgess, defected to the USSR in 1951, but Philby's activities were not fully exposed until he himself defected in 1963.

Bibliography

See his autobiography, My Silent War (1968); P. Knightley, The Master Spy: The Story of Kim Philby (1989); G. Borovik, The Philby Files (1995); A. C. Brown, Treason in the Blood (1995); B. Macintyre, A Spy among Friends (2014).

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References in periodicals archive ?
| Kim Philby, pictured speaking to the British press in 1955 after being officially cleared of being a Soviet agent, surfaced in Moscow and was granted asylum by the Soviets on this day in 1963
1988 - Double agent Kim Philby, the spy of the century who worked for the Soviet Union while being a senior officer in British intelligence, died in Moscow at the age of 76.
1963: Kim Philby, double agent, defected to Russia.
He was also the 'Third Man' of the 'Cambridge Five' spy ring which included Kim Philby, Guy Burgess and Anthony Blunt.
DOUBLE agent Kim Philby stole secret files by taking Britain's intelligence service archivists out boozing, he admits in a newly discovered video.
British double agent Kim Philby detailed his life of betrayal and the ease with which he was able to pass secrets to his Soviet controllers in newly-discovered video footage broadcast by the BBC on Monday.
Times (UK) writer and the author of nine books on World War II spycraft, including Double Cross: The True Story of the D-Day Spies (*** SELECTION Nov/Dec 2012), Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory (*** SELECTION Sept/Oct 2010), and Agent Zigzag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal (***-1/2 SELECTION Mar/Apr 2008), Ben MacIntyre revisits the story of the notorious Kim Philby, the British double agent who spied for the Soviets for three decades.
A SPY AMONG FRIENDS receives a fine reading by John Lee, who has performed in Southern California, written his own plays, and who here lends life and fire to the story of Kim Philby, the greatest spy in history who headed Britain's counterintelligence against the Soviet Union during the Cold War while secretly working for the enemy.
Kim Philby is endlessly fascinating, and the list of books on Philby, though not quite endless, is very long.
about the most famous double agent in history, Kim Philby, author Ben Macintyre argues the key to Philby's success lay in a friendship with one man, Nicholas Elliot, his MI6 colleague.
Collins becomes embroiled in a search to learn about leaked American military secrets, and allegations against British diplomats Donald Maclean and Kim Philby (today, history remembers them as members of the notorious Cambridge Five spy ring).