Kim Yong-Jun


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kim Yong-Jun

 

Born Mar. 3, 1904, in Taegu, in the province of Kyongsang Pukto. Korean painter and art scholar (People’s Democratic Republic of Korea).

In 1931, Kim Yong-jun graduated from an art school in Pyongyang. His works, executed in india ink and watercolor, combine a graphic quality with a subtle color scheme. Kim Yong-jun’s works include Magnolias and Laurels (two scrolls, 1955), Singyechon Shoal (1957), and Early Autumn (1958), which are all in the State Central Fine Arts Museum in Pyongyang. The painting Dance (1957; gold medal winner at a festival of youth and students in Moscow) is in the Museum of Art of the Eastern Peoples in Moscow.

WORKS

Koguryo kobung pyokhwa yongu (A Study of Wall Paintings on Ancient Korean Tombs). Pyongyang, 1958.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Group E itself, the Lebanese team, led by Montenegrin manager Miodrag Raduloviyc, will meet North Korean team led by Kim Yong-jun at the Sharjah Club Stadium at 6pm.
"We know it's going to be a very tough opponent and we are going to play a very good game tomorrow to get the result." North Korea will go into the game without suspended striker Han Kwang-song after he was sent off in the loss to Saudi Arabia, but coach Kim Yong-jun is confident he has enough quality to compensate for the young forward's loss.
"We know it's going to be a very tough opponent and we are going to play a very good game tomorrow to get the result." DPR Korea will go into the game without suspended striker Han Kwang-song after he was sent off in the loss to Saudi Arabia, but coach Kim Yong-jun is confident he has enough quality to compensate for the young forward's loss.
But having swept past Kim Yong-jun's team Pizzi was able to breathe a sigh of relief and claim the side's Russia demons were now firmly in the past.
"I respect all the opponents we might face and, personally, I think history doesn't count in this situation because you have to prove you are better than the opponent." For his part, North Korea's head coach Kim Yong-jun said his team will play against one of the opening round's most difficult draws.
North Korea had to survive a jittery finish against the Saudis after Kim Yong-jun was sent off in stoppage time in their Group Two tie.
Yesterday, North Korea - who last appeared in a World Cup finals in 1966 - won with a 26th-minute goal by Kim Yong-jun.
I cannot predict a result, but I can say that so far we have worked hard to be at our best and hopefully that should be good enough for us to prove to our country that we are here to give off our best," coach Kim Yong-jun said.
Coach Kim Yong-jun has a tough task in hand given the group they are in.