Kimberley

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Kimberley,

geographical area, c.139,000 sq mi (360,010 sq km), Western Australia, NW Australia. The Kimberley Goldfield was the site (1882) of the first major Western Australian gold strike. Cattle and sheep raising are important industries and the region contains four national parks.

Kimberley

(kĭm`bərlē), town (1991 pop. 6,531), SE British Columbia, Canada. Canada's highest city (3,660 ft/1,115 m), it is the site of the Sullivan mine, where large quantities of silver, lead, and zinc are mined.

Kimberley

(kĭm`bərlē), city, now part and seat of Sol Plaatje local municipality, Northern Cape prov., South Africa. Since the 19th cent. the city has been primarily a diamond-mining center, but underground mining, which had not been profitable for some time, was halted in mid-2005. The mine's tailings dumps continue to be processed, and textiles, construction materials, and machinery are manufactured. Kimberley is also an important railroad junction.

The city was founded in 1871 when diamonds were discovered on a nearby farm. The De Beers Consolidated Mines, organized by Cecil RhodesRhodes, Cecil John
, 1853–1902, British imperialist and business magnate. Business Career

The son of a Hertfordshire clergyman, he first went to South Africa in 1870, joining his oldest brother, Herbert, on a cotton plantation in Natal.
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, assumed control of the diamond fields in 1888, and its headquarters are still in Kimberley. In 1899–1900, during the South African WarSouth African War
or Boer War,
1899–1902, war of the South African Republic (Transvaal) and the Orange Free State against Great Britain. Background
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, the city was besieged for 124 days by BoerBoer
[Du.,=farmer], inhabitant of South Africa of Dutch or French Huguenot descent. Boers are also known as Afrikaners. They first settled (1652) near the Cape of Good Hope in what was formerly Cape Province.
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 (Afrikaner) forces. Northern Cape Urban FET College and the McGregor Museum are in Kimberley.

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kimberley

 

a city in the Republic of South Africa, in the northern Cape of Good Hope province. Population, 96,200 (1968; the majority are African and mulatto). Railroad junction. The city was founded in 1871 in connection with the opening of diamond mines. It is a major center for the mining and processing of diamonds. Other industries include metalworking and the manufacture of cement; there are furniture and garment factories and brick-works. Manganese ore, asbestos, and gypsum are mined nearby. A technical college is located in Kimberley. There is also an airport.


Kimberley

 

a plateau in northwestern Australia, composed of ancient crystalline rocks and sandstones (the eastern part is composed of basalt). The surface has eroded into separate plateaus and ranges, which reach an altitude of 936 m at Ord Mountain. The climate is subequatorial, with wet summers. In the north there are eucalyptus evergreen woodlands; there are denser forests in the river valleys. In the south, sparse desert vegetation predominates; cereals and shrubs grow in the sandy areas.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Kimberley

1. a city in central South Africa; the capital of Northern Cape province: besieged (1899--1900) for 126 days during the Boer War; diamond-mining and -marketing centre, with heavy engineering works. Pop.: 62 526 (2001)
2. a plateau region of NW Australia, in N Western Australia: consists of rugged mountains surrounded by grassland. Area: about 360 000 sq. km (140 000 sq. miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Harrison (2006:64) initially stated that 'prior to 1885 few stone Kimberley points ...
Complete Kimberley points are rare on sites but not unknown.
Harrison's attempt to correlate discarded (or lost) tula adze stones with lost or discarded Kimberley points fails to recognise that the former artefacts usually need to be removed by the artisan from their heavy resin mountings before discard--a process that requires fire to warm the mastic--consequently, they are likely to be discarded at occupation sites (or at quarries) when an adze is being refurbished.
Of course, if a Kimberley point was lost on a living site, there was every chance it would be recovered and used at a later date by the finder or his or her associated male kin.
Kath Marriott (front, right), with some of her newly-found Coventry relatives, (front) Damien Kimberley with his baby son Reuben and his father David; (back, from left) Damien's wife, Leanne, Barry Kimberley, Caroline Kimberley, Phyllis Mulholland, Grace Kirkland, Barbara Alton and Maureen Kimberley, Damien's mother.
The use of the term 'Kimberley point' to describe a number of different point forms, ranging from non-invasive marginally retouched uniface points which were manufactured in the Kimberley region (Figure 1), to finely worked symmetrical invasively pressure flaked points with serrated margins, manufactured in areas as far away from the Kimberley as Rottnest Island, has suggested the need for clearer definitions to distinguish between what appear to be temporally and spatially distinct artefact forms.
Wanji bifaces are not invasively flaked and were only pressure flaked in the contact period, and can be clearly distinguished from glass Kimberley points of the contact period in that the pressure flaking is short and occurs only at the margins to provide plan symmetry to the artefact.
* Kimberley points, which are invasively pressure flaked points manufactured on blanks formed by percussive flaking, in which each successive series of pressure flakes 'is taken along one margin and refines half of each face alternately' (1995: 92).
* Kimberley dentate points, which are invasively pressure flaked biface points, where the 'teeth' formed by pressure flaking on the margins are separated by notches wider than their teeth (Akerman et al.
He could even conjure for the masses a pitiable image of Lord Kimberley after Majuba Hill, (18) "studying the faces of the representatives of the dissenting interest and exclaiming: 'A sudden thought strikes me!
in Morley 2:212), the very instance in which Arnold had publicly criticized Kimberley by name (CPW 10:209).
As individuals, Arnold and Kimberley held broadly similar values.