Kinetic architecture


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Kinetic architecture

(1971–1985)
A style depicted by forms that are dynamic, adaptable and responsive to the changing demands of the users. This broad category includes a number of other concepts, such as mobile architecture, which would not necessarily be constantly moving, only capable of being moved if required.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
His practice is focused on claims involving complex technologies in the fields of communications, software, electronics, industrial automation, semiconductor devices, optics, and kinetic architecture and has involved products such as smartphones, automated material handling systems, digital televisions, application specific and general purpose processors, memory devices, power management systems, and display devices, including holographic displays.
Sydney Combining machine learning and kinetic architecture, a team of computational design students in Australia have developed a unique origami-style meeting room that can learn human behaviour and change shape in response to the behaviour of people.
The book quotes Peter Blake, editor of Architectural Forum, who blamed the 1954 tax code's accelerated depreciation rate, which was meant to encourage development with a quick write-off, but "all of a sudden an owner was rewarded for selling out fast!" (page 110) To give a sense of the times, Abramson offers quotes from the post-war growth era, such as "Yesterday's house is as obsolete as yesterday's car" (page 66, from year 1959); article titles such as "Expendability: Towards Throwaway Architecture" (page 71, from year 1963); and publication titles such as Kinetic Architecture (page 76, from mid-1960s), all of which demonstrate the new obsolescence thinking.
At the same time, though, they can be glossed and given a meaningful context, and in the case of Ackerman's notion of a kinetic architecture, the development of his approach can be described with some precision.
More broadly still, Ackerman's emphasis upon a kinetic architecture also parallels certain developments in mid-century philosophy, fine art, and political theory.
She knows when to turn down the flourishes to highlight Wheeldon's kinetic architecture.
Designed by the Spanish architect-engineer Santiago Calatrava, whose dramatic cable-supported bridges were introduced in Barcelona and elsewhere, the new pavilion has been described as an "extensive essay in kinetic architecture, sporting a 217-foot brise-soleil (solar-screen), set atop the museum's glass-sheathed reception area, that opens like the wings of a great bird." The returns are not yet in, but it could just be what America's nineteenth-largest city needs to overcome its blue-collar image and make it a real tourist destination.
By 2087, traces of biomorphism, Deco-Tech, and even classic Roman and Greek architecture could be seen superimposed on kinetic architecture, labeled at that time "super-kinetic."