Kinetic architecture


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Kinetic architecture

(1971–1985)
A style depicted by forms that are dynamic, adaptable and responsive to the changing demands of the users. This broad category includes a number of other concepts, such as mobile architecture, which would not necessarily be constantly moving, only capable of being moved if required.
References in periodicals archive ?
page 110) To give a sense of the times, Abramson offers quotes from the post-war growth era, such as "Yesterday's house is as obsolete as yesterday's car" (page 66, from year 1959); article titles such as "Expendability: Towards Throwaway Architecture" (page 71, from year 1963); and publication titles such as Kinetic Architecture (page 76, from mid-1960s), all of which demonstrate the new obsolescence thinking.
At the same time, though, they can be glossed and given a meaningful context, and in the case of Ackerman's notion of a kinetic architecture, the development of his approach can be described with some precision.
More broadly still, Ackerman's emphasis upon a kinetic architecture also parallels certain developments in mid-century philosophy, fine art, and political theory.
Over the course of the rest of the decade, the two men often exchanged ideas, and in 1961 it was Wittkower, appropriately, who was editing (along with Anthony Blunt) the series in which Ackerman's book on Michelangelo, with its emphasis upon a kinetic architecture, appeared.
Designed by the Spanish architect-engineer Santiago Calatrava, whose dramatic cable-supported bridges were introduced in Barcelona and elsewhere, the new pavilion has been described as an "extensive essay in kinetic architecture, sporting a 217-foot brise-soleil (solar-screen), set atop the museum's glass-sheathed reception area, that opens like the wings of a great bird.
By 2087, traces of biomorphism, Deco-Tech, and even classic Roman and Greek architecture could be seen superimposed on kinetic architecture, labeled at that time "super-kinetic.
He has received more than fifty design awards, publishes regularly in professional journals, and coauthored Kinetic Architecture.
Michael Fox interpreted the kinetic architecture design and mentioned that "When you look at kinetics in architecture.