Kinetoscope


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kinetoscope

 

a device used to view a rapid succession of still photographs, creating the impression of movement in the photographed objects.

The first model of the Kinetoscope was proposed by the American inventor T. Edison in 1891 and was demonstrated in April 1894 in New York. The Kinetoscope was one of the fore-runners of cinematography.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
and Dominion government with reference to the Kinetoscope harvesting scenes in Manitoba.
Its earliest incarnation was Edison's Kinetoscope: a hand-cranked viewer that showed a few minutes of dancing, gymnastics, or people simply walking down the street.
Like Edison's Black Maria, where the immediacy of live performance was atomized into the Kinetoscope's tiny, infinitely repeatable moving images, this show's spatial and temporal play shifted the notion of the event itself.
Because Hawthorne describes a box of many images, "successively" moving before a spectator who looks through a glass and sees the pictures "at the pulling of a string," it is tempting to suggest Hawthorne anticipates not only photography, but Edison's kinetoscope, an early moving picture device that rapidly flipped pictures to simulate motion.
As early as 1878, Eadweard Muybridge showed audiences how to capture motion through photography by using Thomas Edison's Kinetoscope. However, it wasn't until 1910 that director D.W.
Thomas Edison made his first public showing of the kinetoscope.
The Wizard says kinetoscope will do for the eye what phonograph does for the ear.
A reproduction of Edison's first tin-foil phonograph and home projecting kinetoscope decorate the den.
"When Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone in 1876 and Edison the Kinetoscope in 1891, they could never have envisaged how the technologies would merge to become the audio visual experience without wires possible today.
By that time, however, audiences in Rio were already accustomed to new visual mediums from Europe, having experienced so-called 'pre-cinematic forms' such as the magic lantern, the diorama, kinetoscope and panoramas since the start of the Republic, in 1889.
1891: American inventor Thomas Edison gave a public demonstration of his kinetoscope, a moving picture machine.