Kinetoscope


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Kinetoscope

 

a device used to view a rapid succession of still photographs, creating the impression of movement in the photographed objects.

The first model of the Kinetoscope was proposed by the American inventor T. Edison in 1891 and was demonstrated in April 1894 in New York. The Kinetoscope was one of the fore-runners of cinematography.

References in periodicals archive ?
As I see a notice in one of the Brandon papers that John Cosgrove, of the Cosgrove family, was the originator of the Manitoba harvesting scenes and promoter of the kinetoscope exhibitions given by the Cosgrove family, I wish to state that the first kinetoscope the Cosgroves had out .
The kinetoscope will do for the eye what the phonograph does for the ear.
April 14 Thomas Edison demonstrates the kinetoscope, a device for peep-show viewing using photographs that flip in sequence, a precursor to movies;
Edison had conceived of movies accompanied by sound and as early as 1889 had synchronized phonographs to his Kinetoscope.
While not overwhelming us with pop details, Larson offers unmistakably American epic lists of the fair's wares: the first moving pictures on Edison's Kinetoscope, Buffalo Bill Cody and Annie Oakley, Aunt Jemima's pancake mix, Juicy Fruit gum, Cracker Jacks, Shredded Wheat, and most spectacularly, Chicago's answer to Paris, the Ferris wheel.
In the 1890s, licensing for the Kinetoscope and Vitascope had resulted in the United States being carved up into 32 exhibition territories, and this system of sub-distribution lasted well into the '80s.
Edison franchisees opened Kinetoscope parlors in London and Paris.
This is a story that begins with the very earliest moments of cinema and a group of people who appeared seemingly out of nowhere: the lower- and working-class, overwhelmingly immigrant audiences which came first to the kinetoscope midways at the end of the nineteenth century and then to the nickelodeons in the first decade of the twentieth, supporting the new industry with what few entertainment pennies they had to spend.
The completed movies are then distributed from studio to theaters by satellite, over fiber-optic cable or on special discs, and are shown on a digital projector, a significant upgrade from the standard projector whose basic technology has barely changed since Edison's Kinetoscope.
Opening chapters take the readers from the magic lanterns--machines that cast images on an external surface--first used by Venetians in 1420 to the stereopticon machines popular in mid-nineteenth-century America to Edison's perfection of the Kinetoscope in 1891.
It will be followed by the Kinetoscope (1894) and the Vitascope (1896).