King Cotton


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King Cotton

term personifying the chief staple of the South. [Am. Hist.: Hart, 445]
See: Farming
References in periodicals archive ?
While King Cotton ruled the south in the 1860s, King Wheat reined in the Midwest.
With the decline of King Cotton in Lancashire bringing mill closures and the demolition of buildings he knew well, Mr Lowry's output increased to almost frantic proportions as he tried to capture the image of a fast-disappearing era.
Since 1932, the March Of The Ducks to and from the grand lobby fountain accompanied by the tune of King Cotton March has been a favourite with tourists.
It was hard some days to keep this vision alive--for example, when they passed by the state of Mississippi's exhibit: the effigy of King Cotton, a colossus made entirely of cotton rising to the palace rafters, the king's crown soaring high above the two black bodies bent to earth, with half-filled sacks tugging at their shoulders.
They had a King Cotton strategy of coercing Europe to aid the Confederacy by starving Europe of cotton.
In 1861, the newly formed Confederate States of America, attempting to force England into the Civil War as an ally or as the instigator of a compromise that would acknowledge Southern independence, unanimously adopted King Cotton diplomacy.
Moreover, the members of the New Orleans merchant community took it upon themselves to assume a vanguard role in King Cotton diplomacy that was not sanctioned and even at odds with Confederate foreign policy.
Amongst his many powerful cartoons was 'The Idol of England' (Vanity Fair, July 22nd, 1861) in which John Bull, Mr Punch, Lord Derby, Lord Russell and Lord Palmerston are seen worshipping King Cotton who is portrayed devouring black slaves.
King Cotton at the Liverpool Empire was Jimmy McGovern's first stage work in 30 years, a multilayered examination of the plight of two individuals, a cotton worker in Britain and a cotton picker in the USA during the American Civil War.
The TV Bafta award winning screenwriter was being interviewed on Radio 5 Live about his first stage play in 20 years, King Cotton.
At one point during the reign of King Cotton, farmers in the south central United States controlled boll weevils with arsenic-based pesticides, and residual arsenic still contaminates the soil.
High costs, urban sprawl and a shift to more profitable permanent crops are dethroning King Cotton in the Golden State.