King Cotton


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King Cotton

term personifying the chief staple of the South. [Am. Hist.: Hart, 445]
See: Farming
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fiege's sense of hybridity is on particularly good display in 'King Cotton', wherein he explains how the biological realities of slaves' bodies and the cotton plants they tended often augmented slaves' agency and limited that of their masters.
Higher levees also set the stage for King Cotton, which thrived on the region's increasingly dry alluvial soils.
He was dubbed "King Cotton" by the Beatles' George Harrison.
Chapters Six through Eight describe American adaptations to the Mississippi via King Cotton. Efforts to "dry" the river also accelerated during this period.
It is reasonable to speculate that southerners' use of a related term, King Cotton, subtly acknowledged that the plant had mastered them at least as much as they had mastered it."
Crowds gather daily to witness the spectacle, which is played out to the tune of John Philip Sousa's King Cotton March.
Johnson (history and African and African American studies, Harvard U.) explores the aspirations and experiences of the range of those whose lives revolved around the "river of dark dreams," from Thomas Jefferson's failed vision of white yeoman farmers peopling a land violently wrested from the Native Americans to the Southern plantation owners who dreamed of an expansionist slave empire extending beyond the Mississippi region, but placing at the center of the story the slaves who carried out the work, suffered under the regime of King Cotton, and helped shape its demise through their resistance.
"If his genius led King Cotton to triumph in the South," Brown muses, "it also created the technology with which the North won the Civil War." FC
King Cotton is not a new topic, but by connecting the Lower South planters and politicians who depended on it and chattel slavery with the world economy, Schoen makes a significant contribution to reframing U.S.
While King Cotton ruled the south in the 1860s, King Wheat reined in the Midwest.
With the decline of King Cotton in Lancashire bringing mill closures and the demolition of buildings he knew well, Mr Lowry's output increased to almost frantic proportions as he tried to capture the image of a fast-disappearing era.