Kanishka

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Kanishka

(kənĭsh`kə), fl. c.A.D. 120, king of GandharaGandhara
, historic region of India, now in NW Pakistan. Situated astride the middle Indus River, the region had Taxila and Peshawar as its chief cities. It was originally a province of the Persian Empire and was reached (327 B.C.) by Alexander the Great.
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. He was the most powerful and renowned ruler of the Kushan dynasty, one of the five tribes of the Yüeh-chih who had divided (1st cent. B.C.) Bactria among them. Earlier Kushan kings had extended their dominion into N India, and Kanishka ruled over an empire that stretched from the Pamirs to Bengal. His capital was at Peshawar. A patron of Buddhism, he built many Buddhist monuments, helped found the Gandharan school of sculpture, and encouraged the spread of Buddhism to central Asia.

Kanishka

 

King of the Kushan Empire from a. d. 78 to a. d. 123 (dates vary) who conquered nearly all of northern India.

Kanishka transferred the political center of the state to Puru-shapura (present-day Peshawar, Pakistan). A process of Indiani-zation of the Kushan conquerors began during Kanishka’s reign; he himself is known to have been a Buddhist. Kanishka’s rule coincided with the flowering of economic and cultural life in northern India and Central Asia; in addition, trade with China and the Roman Empire (the Great Silk Route and sea trade) grew to great proportions.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the days of King Kanishka in the first century of the Common Era, Buddhist pilgrims came from all over the eastern world to pray at the site and visit the Buddha's begging bowl on the hilltop.
One of the most famous surviving pieces currently in Kabul Museum is the Rabatak inscription of King Kanishka. Mohammad Yahya Mohebzada, deputy head of Kabul Museum, told Arab News that prior to the Afghan civil war, museum staff had suggested moving the precious Tilla Tepe gold and jewelry collection along with other valuable items to a safe area in the presidential palace for protection.
The story follows a young Jaya, a girl whose father is tasked with creating a statue of the Buddha for King Kanishka's birthday.
A clear instance of the second scenario, which is not discussed in the volume under review, is the preservation of the slightly modified Greek alphabet for writing Bactrian after the Kushan king Kanishka gave up Greek as the official written language in the region.