Pentheus

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Pentheus

(pĕn`thēəs), in Greek mythology, king of Thebes, son of Cadmus' daughter Agave. When Dionysus came to Thebes, Pentheus denied his divinity and tried to prevent his ecstatic rites. The women of Thebes, led by Agave, were driven mad by the offended god and tore Pentheus to pieces. The story is the subject of Euripides' Bacchae.
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(20) The maenads, led by King Pentheus's mother and aunts, reportedly tore apart a herd of cattle.
I suppose the nearest one can think of the spirit of Butoh in Western art is what happens offstage in Euripides' Bacchae, outside Thebes at the Dionysian festivals when, believing she had participated in killing a mountain lion, a woman realizes that she had torn her son, the king Pentheus, limb from limb, and is now holding his bloody head in her hands, deluded into thinking it a trophy.
Chief of the god's enemy was young King Pentheus, who refuses to recognize Dionysus as a god.
This sounded a bit like Dionysus inviting King Pentheus for a jolly picnic, so I declined.