Kiparissia

Kiparissia

 

(Kyparissiakos kolpos), an open gulf of the Ionian Sea, on the western coast of the Peloponnesus (Greece). The Gulf of Kiparissia extends 18 km inland. It is 51 km wide at its mouth and reaches depths of more than 500 m. The tide is semidiurnal, with a net change of 0.2 m. The Alfios River empties into the gulf.

References in periodicals archive ?
Three great sandy strandlines extend for more than 100 km along the coast of Elis in the western Peloponnese, Kiparissia to Katakolon, to Chlemoutsi, to Araxos (Fig.
In the Mesolithic-Neolithic periods, the shoreline of the Guff of Kiparissia lay up to 5 km to the east.
Our core data cannot establish whether this spit extended into a lagoon surrounding the islet of Kleidhi or occupied an islet just off the coast in shallow waters of the Gulf of Kiparissia. Either would have been a strategic setting.
1001, under the outer progradational barrier system at the edge of the Gulf of Kiparissia. This marsh feature under the barrier accretion ridges at core P2 indicates a transgressive event, possibly a storm wave overwash feature succeeded by continual progradation of the barrier accretion plain, or, perhaps less likely, evidence of an upward pulse in the late Holocene sea level.
Time-transgressive barrier elements suggest arcuate shorelines merging with coastal barriers of the Gulf of Kiparissia (Fig.
According to Leake, Epitalion had a fishing port on the shore of Agoulenitsa Lagoon, not on the Gulf of Kiparissia, and a commerce port on the Alpheios River.
6000 B.C.), a broad marine re-entrant of the Gulf of Kiparissia lay east-northeast of Cape Katakolon, well protected from the northerly and westerly wave patterns of the Ionian Sea.
Our cross section across Lake Kasta to the shore of the Gulf of Kiparissia shows the vertical profile of the two large barrier features with high-crested dune fields that postdate the Neolithic lagoon (Figs.
Figures 15 and 16 show the relationship of Cape Katakolon to the Ionian Sea and to the northwest corner of the Gulf of Kiparissia. This high, rocky barrier has created a harborlike embayment to the east and north since the Mesolithic period, and today its southeast flank provides a harbor for the fishing fleet and a debarkation point for cruises visiting the nearby site of Olympia.
Clearly, the concept of Kleidhi, the key to passage between the northern and southern parts of the coastal zones of the Gulf of Kiparissia, is a well-deserved epithet applicable from the Helladic to Geometric period.