Kirchhoff's equations

Kirchhoff's equations

[′kərk‚hōfs i‚kwā·zhənz]
(thermodynamics)
Equations which state that the partial derivative of the change of enthalpy (or of internal energy) during a reaction, with respect to temperature, at constant pressure (or volume) equals the change in heat capacity at constant pressure (or volume).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to verify the accuracy of the diffraction coefficients at hand, the total fields computed with them were here compared to the solutions calculated solving Kirchhoff's equations. All the fields refer to the case of a TM excitation.
Formulating Kirchhoff's equations and the associated discrete Helmholtz equation followed by the weak scatterer assumptions renders the nonlinear equation for the perturbed elements linear, though frequency dispersive, see in Sec.