Kirchhoff theory

Kirchhoff theory

[′kərk‚hōf ‚thē·ə·rē]
(optics)
A theory of diffraction of light which gives a mathematical formulation of Huygens' principle, based on the wave equation and Green's theorem, and enables quantitative determination of the amplitude and phase at any point to a very close approximation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Kirchhoff theory is widely used to describe light scattering from a rough surface due to its relative simplicity within certain limits.
In many approaches based on the Kirchhoff theory, the normalization of the relative reflectance corresponds to a point detector.
Some of the textured surfaces of interest in this work are too rough for the Kirchhoff theory to be valid ([S.sub.q] [much greater than] [lambda]); they are also dielectric and some of them can contribute to the measured gloss by bulk scattering from non-black pigments.