Kirkendall effect


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Kirkendall effect

[′kərk·ən‚dȯl i‚fekt]
(metallurgy)
The phenomenon whereby a marker placed at the interface between an alloy and a metal moves toward the alloy region when the temperature of the system is raised to the point where diffusion can occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
They cover linear and nonlinear diffusion; the Kirkendall effect and inverse Kirkendall effect; ripening among nano-precipitates; spinodal decomposition; nucleation events in bulk materials, thin films, and nanowires; contact reactions on silicon: plane, line, and point contact reactions; grain growth in microscale and nanoscale; self-sustaining reactions in nanoscale multi-layered thin films; and the formation and transformations of nanotwins in copper.