Kirkendall effect

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Kirkendall effect

[′kərk·ən‚dȯl i‚fekt]
(metallurgy)
The phenomenon whereby a marker placed at the interface between an alloy and a metal moves toward the alloy region when the temperature of the system is raised to the point where diffusion can occur.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bump resistance increase was correlated to intermetallic growth and occurrence of Kirkendall voiding. Major crack development due to void growth and coalescence catalyzed by thermal mismatch stress finally led to an open joint.
This, combined with the Al wire and Al die metallization, allows actual device junction temperatures up to 200[degrees]C without the reliability risks associated with using typical plastic packages with Au wire on Al die metallization above 150[degrees]C (Kirkendall voiding).
The challenge when aluminum wire is used on a gold conductor is that Al/Au intermetallics form and Kirkendall voiding occurs.