Kirtimukha


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Kirtimukha

the Face of Glory, depicted as a lion’s head, without body or limbs. [Hindu Myth.: Barber & Riches]
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But in Kathmandu animals were sacrificed at the Jaya Bageshwori Temple and Kirtimukha Bhairav of Pashupati as per the age-old tradition.
the lintel, jambs and the kirtimukha frieze of the present portal, and some smaller decorative pieces from inside the temple).
To gain some idea of the book's range one has only to glance at the table of contents: here we find architectural motifs, elements of landscape, geometrical patterns, lotus rhizomes, floriated scroll work, the treatment of animals in their various aspects, the kirtimukha motif, amorous couples, nagas, garudas, divine flying figures notably gandharvas, apsaras, vidyadharas, dwarves of various types, udaremukhas with a face for a stomach kinnaras (half bird, half human), kiratas (forest dwellers), yaksas including Manibhadra, Purnabhadra, and Kubera, yaksinis.
In architectural works predating European civilization, he decorates Hindu and Jain temples in India, and temples in Malaysia where his function as "Kirtimukha" or "the face of Glory" was to frighten away evildoers.
Below the seat is the design of two tendrils culminating in a tiny bud carved on both sides, while the central section depicts kirtimukha design.
Arched stone portals--toranas, guarded by carved kala heads (akin to kirtimukha or "face of glory")--span the steps leading from each terrace to the next (figure 4).
The story of Sudhana represents the spiritual quest of the pilgrim, who having passed under the kirtimukha (Face of Glory) embarks on a path that simultaneously symbolizes death and spiritual rebirth.