Kittim


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Kittim

or

Chittim

(both: kĭt`ĭm). 1 Biblical term for Cyprus; often extended to include lands W of Syria. The name originally designated the Phoenician port of CitiumCitium
, ancient city of Cyprus, on the southeast coast, the modern Larnaca; also called Cition. Of Mycenaean origins, it was a major port with valuable saltworks and an important center under Phoenician and Assyrian rulers. It is identical with the biblical Kittim. Zeno was born there.
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 in Cyprus. 2 Term appearing in the Dead Sea ScrollsDead Sea Scrolls,
ancient leather and papyrus scrolls first discovered in 1947 in caves on the NW shore of the Dead Sea. Most of the documents were written or copied between the 1st cent. B.C. and the first half of the 1st cent. A.D.
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, used of the Romans. The Kittim are referred to as warriors from the west, who capture Jerusalem.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Con posterioridad a la firma del Acuerdo, en el ambito de las Comunidades integradas en FEREDE, han estado vigentes los Rituales contenidos en el Manual de Ceremonias de Kittim Silva, publicado el ano 1992 en Libros CLIE, y el Manual de Ceremonias Matrimoniales, elaborado por Mario Ruiz dentro de la obra Liturgia para el siglo XXI, publicada en 1999 por la misma editorial.
The Travelling Man, Kittim, Brightwell, The Collector .
He argued that there was an ambivalence in the War Scroll between the nationalistic opposition of Israel and the Kittim, and the opposition of light and darkness.
The War Scroll either describes a battle that has already taken place (perhaps the final battle of the Israelites against the Kittim from the Book of Daniel) or prophesies a battle yet to come; in either case, it includes intriguing descriptions of contemporary war tactics similar to those used by 'the Romans.
They've had sinister names to match their murderous methodology, like Pudd, Kittim and Caleb Kyle.
From the fifth century we can follow the city's fortunes more clearly, and in the fourth the volume rightly includes testimonia and inscriptions, several of them bilinguals in Phoenician and Cypriot-Greek syllabic script, from Idalion, which was then its dependency; one of the volume's strengths is its careful consideration of Kition's territorial boundaries at different times (though why Kittim because the Hebrew designation for all Westerners, when it was so heavily Phoenician, remains obscure).