Klabund


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Klabund

(kläbo͝ont`), pseud. of

Alfred Henschke

(äl`frĕt hĕnsh`kə), 1890–1928, German poet, novelist, and dramatist. A skillful translator and adapter of Asian literature, he wrote original poems in a Chinese style. His play Kreidekreis (1924, tr. Circle of Chalk, 1929), based on Chinese legend, was very popular. His novels include Bracke (1918, tr. Brackie the Fool, 1927) and Pjotr (1923, tr. Peter the Czar, 1925).
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An imported chinoiserie, James Laver's version was a straight English translation of Der Kreidekreis (The Chalk Circle, 1925), an adaptation by the German writer Klabund (Alfred Henschke, 1890-1928), based on a German version of Stanislas Julien's 1832 French translation of The Story of the Chalk Circle (Huilan ji), a thirteenth-century Yuan drama written by Li Qianfu (or Li Xingdao).
James Laver noted that "Klabund was compelled, for Western taste, to make two important modifications in the original play: he had to tone down its ruthlessness, and he had to provide what is called Tove-interest."' (32) E.
Olivier can also be seen in James Laver's version of Klabund's The Circle of Chalk and Gielgud's production of Gordon Daviot's Queen of Scots, and Peggy Ashcroft in Ashley Dukes's adaptation of Leon Feuchtwanger's Jew Suss.
Modeled on Klabund's History of German Literature in One Hour, thus "with no academic responsibility," Volker Weidermann's coverage is based mostly on his own taste and understanding, though this seems largely to comport with the consensus (e.g., that The Tin Drum remains Grass's best book and that Handke put the kibosh on Group 47).
But no brilliant translator--Rilke, Stefan George, Klabund, Richard Wilbur--emerges.
The list is incomplete; there are omissions based either on my particular taste or imperfect knowledge: Werner Bergengrun, Ernst Bertram, Wolf Biermann, Georg Britting, Hans Carossa, Theodor Daubler, Peter Gan, Albrecht Goes, Ivan Goll, Rudolf Hagelstange, Max Hermann-Niesse, Hermann Hesse, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Friedrich Georg Junger, Erich Kastner, Klabund (pseudonym of Alfred Henschke), Karl Krolow, Wilhem Lehmann, Oskar Loerke, Otto zur Linde, Agnes Miegel, Alfred Mombert, Christian Morgenstern (other than that fishy nonverbal piece), Joachim Ringelnatz, Friedrich Schnack, Wilhelm von Scholz, Rudolf Alexander Schroder, August Stramm, Josef Weinheber, Konrad Weiss, Anton Wildgans, Georg von der Wring, and Carl Zuckmayer.
For example, it is unclear how the aesthetics of desublimation he praises in Klabund's characterization of "evening clouds" as "tattered vagabonds" (58) differ in any significant way from T.
Readers who are familiar with the cabaret-style verses of Walter Mehring or Kurt Tucholsky, of Kastner or Klabund (to say nothing of their more trivial contemporaries Friedrich Hollaender and Marcellus Schiffer), will not be particularly surprised that Lareau is able to find examples of their work which are certainly not overtly political.
The work is based on the German writer Klabund's play Der Kreidekreis (1924), itself a translation and adaptation of a Chinese play from the Yuan dynasty (1206-1368).
(Der kaukasische Kreidekreis, 1944 - 45; first performed in English, 1948; in German, 1954; published 1954) A play by Bertolt Brecht, based on Klabund 's version of a 13th-century Chinese play, The Circle of Chalk.
Henschke identified with the eternally seeking wandering poet and called himself Klabund, a name derived from Klabautermann ("hobgoblin") and Vagabund ("vagabond").
Klabund was a versatile writer with expressionistic leanings and wide cultural interests which are expressed in his historical novels, Mohammed (1917), Borgia (1928), and Rasputin (1929).