Klallam


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Klallam

(klăl`əm), Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Salishan branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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). They formerly occupied the southern tip of Vancouver Island, B.C., and the south shore of the Strait of Juan de Fuca to Puget Sound. There are presently three bands of Klallam in the United States: the Jamestown, Lower Elwha, and Port Gamble, all in Washington state. They have a total population of about 1,500 and are engaged primarily in commercial fishing.
References in periodicals archive ?
One is Klallam, for which there were still five speakers recorded in the 1990 Census, but which is now regarded as extinct, with its last native speaker having died in 2014.
It's a familiar scenario: The dams fueled the local economy, but they also closed off 70 miles of salmon habitat, had a dismal effect on the ecosystem and flooded the homelands of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe.
Klallam Controls Company, Klallam Controls Company, 1313 E Maple St.
Celia Barton (WDNR), Robert Sizemore (WDFW), Kelly Toy (Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe), and Doug Morrill (Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe) organized the sampling of wild geoducks.
Project Summary: The Pysht River project is a collaboration between the Makah and Lower Elwha Klallam tribes, Washington Department of Transportation, and private citizens who reside along the river to reduce flood hazards to State Highway 112 and nearby houses, and to improve spawning and rearing habitat for native salmon.
Both were built over the objections of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, whose nation sits at the mouth of the Elwha and once relied on the river's teeming salmon runs.
The Strong People" - Boston directors Matthew Loew and Heather Hoglund document the recovery after a dam removal on the Elwha River in Washington and the reaction of the indigenous Klallam Tribe.
In 2004, Washington state halted construction on a section of a major bridge project, on which $58 million had already been spent, at the request of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe after remains of an ancient Indian village and burial ground was discovered.
She interviewed several people involved in the project while in the area, hiked through one of the river's tributaries in hip waders with biologists sampling turbidity levels, and visited the river's mouth on the Lower Elwha Klallam reservation.
the loss of traditional fisheries, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe became
Niatum is an enrolled member of the Klallam (Jamestown band).
The tribes involved in the project are the Jamestown S'Klallam, Lower Elwha Klallam, Hoh, Quileute, Makah and Port Gamble S'Klallam.