Klaw


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Klaw

(pop culture)
Stan Lee and Jack Kirby's Klaw first struck a chord with readers in Fantastic Four #53 (1966). In a flashback, mad scientist Ulysses Klaw safaris into the African nation of Wakanda for its uncommon mineral vibranium, needed to power his “sound transformer.” King T'Chaka forbids this interloper access; Klaw responds by ordering his aides to shoot the king before the horrified eyes of his son, T'Challa. The grieving lad defiantly fires Klaw's own weapon at him, destroying the scientist's right hand. Flash forward to the present, as an unforgiving Klaw resurfaces wearing a sonic prosthetic, seeking revenge against the adult T'Challa—now the superhero Black Panther—who, aided by his friends the Fantastic Four, defeats this self-proclaimed Master of Sound. At story's end, Klaw cryptically crawls into the aural vortex of his sound transformer. Three issues later (#56, 1966), Klaw was back, re-created into a crimson-hued robotic-like being of living sound. With his sonic claw channeling his powers, Klaw pummeled the FF with concussive blasts and near-deafening acoustic surges. This story was adapted to animation in an episode of Hanna-Barbera's Fantastic Four series (1967–1970), in which the villain's name was altered to “Klaws.” FF #53, Klaw's origin, was retread as “Prey of the Black Panther” in the third cartoon incarnation of Fantastic Four (1994–1996). In this version, Klaw, played by Charles Howarton, was a businessman, not a scientist. After his two initial comic-book outings, Klaw was back in print in 1968 as one of the Masters of Evil, challenging a different super-team, the Avengers. Since then, he has proven one of Marvel Comics' most durable do-badders, continuing his grudge against the Black Panther but also battling Ka-Zar, Quasar, the Thunderbolts, and Captain America, and joining forces with Dr. Doom, the Molecule Man, the Frightful Four, and other villains.
References in periodicals archive ?
Establishing a partnership with KLAW Products is very exciting for Proserv.
Selon Barbara Klaw, cette autocensure se justifiait, a la fois par << l'effet disciplinaire >> produit par l'enquete judiciaire a laquelle etait soumise Beauvoir, et aussi, pour assurer la publication de L'Invitee.
Klaw discusses the ambiguity surrounding what it means to act with a corrupt purpose.
Klaw explains the importance of emotionally connecting with clients but also of putting up a wall so clients' problems don't become hers.
Although Klaw burned most of them but his sister and fellow photographer Paula Klaw wasn't intimidated - she not only kept her collection of photos, but also kept Page's costumes and props, too.
There is no mention of the 1897 and 1898 passion-play films by Walter Freeman, produced by Klaw and Erlanger of soon-to-follow Ben-Hur fame, and by Rich Hollaman, although these are the origin of narrative cinema about antiquity.
2008; Humphreys and Klaw 2001) and in conjunction with other IBIs (Hester et al.
Further reading Plato, The Republic (many editions and translations); Spencer Klaw, Without Sin: The Life and Death of the Oneida Community (Penguin, 1993); Maren Lockwood Carden, Oneida: Utopian Community to Modern Corporation (Johns Hopkins, 1971); J.
UK-BASED Klaw Products is a world renowned company, which designs and manufactures breakaway couplings and emergency release systems.
Rhodes and DuBois (2006) have noted that although the optimal amount of time a formal mentoring relationship needs to last for youths to reap the greatest benefits is not yet clear, research on natural mentoring relationships suggests that relationships that last for several years--and thus help shepherd youths through significant developmental transitions--may be especially beneficial (for example, Klaw, Fitzgerald, & Rhodes, 2003).
The distinction between American cinematic representations of Indians and Australian depictions of Aborigines is best exemplified by the 1914 Klaw & Erlanger production The Indian.
Stuart Blackton--and theatre directors and producers who made films--David Belasco, the Shuberts, William Brady, Daniel Frohman, Klaw and Erlanger--let alone the performers, designers, stage mechanics, stage managers, choreographers, and writers who crossed one-way or back and forth, from one medium to the other.