Klinger, Max

Klinger, Max

(mäks klĭng`ər), 1857–1920, German painter, sculptor, and etcher. Before 1886 he produced cycles of original and somewhat morbidly imaginative etchings, such as Deliverances of Sacrificial Victims Told in Ovid and Brahms-Phantasie. From 1886 to 1894 Klinger devoted himself primarily to painting, usually on a grandiose scale. Among his paintings are Judgment of Paris and Christ on Olympus (both: Vienna). After 1894 he worked predominantly in sculpture, his most successful medium. Notable examples are Salome, Cassandra, and the dramatic polychromed statue of Beethoven (all: Leipzig) and the bust of Nietzsche (Weimar).
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Klinger, Max

 

Born Feb. 18, 1857, in Leipzig; died July 4, 1920, in Grossjena, in the present-day German Democratic Republic. German painter, graphic artist, and sculptor.

In the series of etchings A Life (1881–84), Dramas (1883), A Love (1887), and Of Death (1889, 1898–1910), Klinger combines vivid portrayals of real life and its acute social problems with fantasy and tragic pessimism. It is in his paintings, however, that elements of art nouveau, pretentious mystical symbolism, and naturalism are most evident (for example, Christ on Olympus, 1897, Austrian Gallery of the 19th and 20th Centuries, Vienna). Klinger sought to revive polychromatic sculpture (for example, Beethoven; marble, plaster of paris, and bronze; 1886–1902; Museum of Fine Arts, Leipzig).

REFERENCE

Max Klinger. . . . Zum 100. Geburtstag. Leipzig, 1957.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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