Cook Inlet

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Cook Inlet

 

(Kenai Inlet) a gulf of the Pacific Ocean, located on the southern shores of Alaska. Length 370 km; width, 18–111 km; depth, 22–78 m. The shores in the south are high, rocky, and heavily indented, while those in the north are low-lying. Tides are semidiurnal and as great as 12 m. The strong tidal bore reaches 15.5 km per hr. The port of Anchorage is at the far end of the inlet. Cook Inlet was discovered and explored by J. Cook in 1778.

References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, with a flooding tide belugas move up Knik Arm to utilize typically inaccessible mudflats and river mouth areas for foraging (Ezer et al.
GIS assessment of Cook Inlet beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) habitat parameters in the Knik Arm area of Anchorage, AK.
The latter sightings (1999-2000), with the exception of the lone upper inlet sighting in Knik Arm in September 2000, were also reported in Manly (7).
Shannon McCarthy, a spokeswoman for Alaska's Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, says the proposed toll bridge over the Knik Arm is the largest project the department has taken on in years.
Crane operators at the Port of Anchorage have also reported seeing several hundred whales at a time in Knik Arm (Smith (6)), and Natives describe how belugas tend to concentrate in Knik Arm later in the summer (Huntington, 2000).
During that time she also worked with the Knik Arm Bridge and Toll Authority.
Smaller aircraft also use public runways at Birchwood and Goose Bay in Knik Arm, Merrill Field, Girdwood, the Kenai Municipal Airport, Ninilchik, Homer, and Seldovia.
His last job before retiring again in 2007 was as executive director of the Knik Arm Bridge and Toll Authority (KABATA).
After 18 August, nearly all locations recorded through 12 September were in Knik Arm, particularly in the area adjacent to the mouth of the Eagle River (Fig.
It is time for the state to build the bridge across Knik Arm.
Case in point: the Knik Arm bridge expected to transport vehicles and people from Anchorage to the Matanuska-Susitna Borough and points north.
Within upper Cook Inlet, little hunting takes place in Turnagain Arm due to the strength of tidal currents and winds, and so most of the information is centered on the region from the Kenai River across the inlet to Trading Bay and north to Knik Arm and Chickaloon Bay (Fig.