Knob Lake

Knob Lake

 

an iron ore deposit in Canada, in the central part of the Labrador Peninsula, on the northwestern shore of Knob Lake (Quebec), within the Labrador Iron Ore Belt. Industrial reserves of ore (more than 50 percent Fe) are estimated at 0.5 billion tons; exploitation began in 1954. The ore is shipped out through the port of Sept-Îles on the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with which the mining settlement of Schefferville is linked by rail.

References in periodicals archive ?
He landed a summer job at McGill's Subarctic Research Laboratory in Knob Lake, Quebec, and so embarked on a life-long love affair with the Canadian North.
As Martin (1959) has recently deduced, the tree size suggests a taiga or open forest type of association, such as is now found at Knob Lake near 54[degrees] North Lat.
Nevertheless, in comparable forest environment at Knob Lake, mean annual precipitation is only 32 in.; but Juneau surrounded by active glaciers gets 83 in.
TABLE 1 Today's climate where the glacier used to be Mean daily temperature Annual January July Former ice source areas in Canada Knob Lake Area 23[degrees]F -11[degrees]F 55[degrees]F L.
The McGill Sub-Arctic Research Laboratory opened in 1954, when the railroad from the new port of Sept Iles reached Knob Lake (later Schefferville), Quebec, to open up the massive iron mines of that region.
The Lab students and staff lived together in a building that was the 24-hour operating weather station, "Knob Lake A." The director lived in an adjacent building that contained a tiny library, a darkroom, and a seismograph.
Data from these projects were reported regularly as an adjunct to the Knob Lake A weather station reports.
There he earned his Master of Science degree with Bill Weber by working up plant collections he had made at the Knob Lake subarctic field station of McGill University, Schefferville, Quebec, followed by a doctorate with John Marr on primary succession on the Muldrow Glacier foreland, Denali National Park.
In my opinion, the major value of Harper's work lies in the wealth of natural history observations contained in his major papers, especially those focused on a single locality such as Windy River or Knob Lake. The subarctic boreal forest and the subarctic forest-arctic tundra ecotone, where Harper conducted his northern fieldwork, are still relatively unknown from a biological standpoint.