Koch's postulates


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Koch's postulates

[′kōks ′päs·chə·ləts]
(microbiology)
A set of laws elucidated by Robert Koch: the microorganism identified as the etiologic agent must be present in every case of the disease; the etiologic agent must be isolated and cultivated in pure culture; the organism must produce the disease when inoculated in pure culture into susceptible animals; a microorganism must be observed in and recovered from the experimentally diseased animal. Also known as law of specificity of bacteria.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding Koch's postulates and how they can be used to diagnose a disease, and how this relates to the movement of disease within a population (epidemiology) are central themes within microbiology.
blattarum does not currently fulfill Koch's postulates, as observation under the microscope is currently the only way to identify this multiflagellated protozoon.
Pathogenecity testing of the causal organism fulfilled the Koch's postulates. To our knowledge, this is the first leaf spot disease report of triangle palm by A.
One basic step for establishing the causal agent of a disease involving microorganisms is the application of Koch's postulates (Fredericks & Relman 2012).
In 1850, Rayer and Davaine discovered the rods in the blood of anthrax-infected sheep, setting the stage for Koch to link the disease to the bacterium in 1876, after he performed a series of experiments that fulfilled what came to be known as Koch's postulates. This was among the first times a microorganism was conclusively linked with a specific disease.
The authors also state that traditional scientific research has "thus far not established a definitive role for imidacloprid in causing CCD." This should tell them something, since if CCD (colony collapse disorder) were actually due to that insecticide, it would be simple to test Koch's postulates and create CCD by administration of the chemical.
At last, the fungus was reisolated from the infected plants tissue which one had been artificially infected, therefore fulfilling Koch's postulates. Acervuli with exuding black masses of conidia (Figure 1-B) were observed at the margins of the cankers.
These observations were in conformity with two of the four postulates (known as "Koch's postulates") formulated by Koch himself in 1882 to establish the microbial aetiology of infectious diseases (5).
Traditionally, microbiologists used Koch's postulates to establish whether or not a particular microbe caused a specific disease.
This is true in particular when, despite statistical significance of observed differences, findings are counter to everyday clinical experience or they are not clearly adherent to--or a logical consequence of--strict criteria such as Koch's postulates. Clinicians could also suggest the proper timing for large and expensive epidemiological trials, which should be performed exclusively when adequate metrics and reliable pathophysiologic causative mechanisms between determinants and outcomes have been established.