Kodiak Island

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Kodiak Island

(kō`dēăk'), 5,363 sq mi (13,890 sq km), c.100 mi (160 km) long and 10–60 mi (16–96 km) wide, off S Alaska, separated from the Alaska PeninsulaAlaska Peninsula,
SW Alaska, extending 500 mi (800 km) SW from the mainland, separating Bristol Bay and the Bering Sea from Cook Inlet, the Shelikof Strait, and Pacific Ocean.
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 by Shelikof Strait. Alaska's largest island, Kodiak is mountainous and heavily forested in the north and east; the native grasses in the south offer good pasturage for cattle and sheep. The island has many ice-free, deeply penetrating bays that provide sheltered anchorages and transportation routes. The Kodiak bear and the Kodiak king crab are native to the island. Most of the island is a national wildlife refuge. In 1912 the eruption of Mt. Katmai on the mainland blanketed the island with volcanic ash, causing widespread destruction and loss of life (see Katmai National Park and PreserveKatmai National Park and Preserve
, at the northern end of the Alaska Peninsula on Shelikof Strait, S Alaska, comprising Katmai National Park (3,674,530 acres/1,487,664 hectares) and an adjoining preserve (418,699 acres/169,514 hectares).
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). Explored in 1763 by Russian fur trader Stepan Glotov, the island was the scene of the first permanent Russian settlement in Alaska, founded by Grigori Shelekhov, a fur trader, on Three Saints Bay in 1784. The settlement was moved to Kodiak village in 1792 and became the center of Russian fur trading. The largest town on the island is Kodiak (1990 pop. 6,365). Salmon fishing is a major occupation; the Karluk River is famous for its salmon run. Livestock farms, numerous canneries, and some copper mining are also prevalent.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 Medians and ranges of carapace widths (mm) for proposed molt stages of southern Tanner crabs (Chionoecetes bairdi) collected during 2010 and 2011 from all 4 sites that were surveyed around Kodiak Island, Alaska. Increment percentages indicate the relative increase in carapace width from one molt stage to the next.
This study took place in Womens Bay, which is located in the Gulf of Alaska near the city of Kodiak on Kodiak Island, Alaska, and is a popular site for commercial, sport, and subsistence fishing for a variety of finfish and shellfish species (Fig.
Table 1 Final conditions determined in this study for the 192 red king crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus) or their tags that were tracked by acoustic tagging in association with other projects over the period of 1991-2008 in Womens Bay, Kodiak Island, Alaska. "Molted" means the tagged crab molted.
Although direct information on fish growth (e.g., growth rates of smolts and postsmolts at standard times and locations) is not available, measurements from archived scales can be used to indirectly estimate the freshwater and marine growth rates of age 2.2 (1) sockeye salmon that returned to Karluk River and Lake system on Kodiak Island, Alaska, from 1922 to 2000, with the exception of seven years for which data were missing.
Smolt length (freshwater, FW), and juvenile (first-year marine, M1), immature (second-year marine, M2), and maturing (third-year marine, M3) growth were estimated from measurement on the scales of age-2.2 sockeye salmon that returned to the Karluk system, Kodiak Island, Alaska. "Yes" indicates normal distribution and equal variances of the growth variables.
Table 1 Number of age-0 walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) collected near Kodiak Island, Alaska, September 1993, measured for standard length, and examined in the laboratory to estimate condition, growth, and the weight and taxonomic composition of stomach contents.
Topographically controlled flow around a deep trough transecting the shelf off Kodiak Island, Alaska. J.
Food resource partitioning among demersal fishes in the vicinity of Kodiak Island, Alaska. M.S.
Summer food of the Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus, near Kodiak Island, Alaska. Fish.