Kodori


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kodori

 

(also Kodor), a river in the Abkhazian ASSR. Length, 80 km; basin area, 2,030 sq km. The Kodori is formed by the confluence of the Sakeni and Gvandra rivers, which rise on the southwestern slopes of the Greater Caucasus. The Kodori flows through a narrow gorge. At a distance of 25 km from its mouth, it emerges into a lowland, forming a delta where it empties into the Black Sea. The river is fed by mixed sources (primarily rain). The average flow rate at a point 25 km from its mouth is 123 cu m per sec. The Kodori is used for floating timber.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Russia pushed into Georgia, Abkhazian forces opened a second front and attacked the Kodori valley.
Abhaasi kes ametlikult sAaAaAeA jas ei osalenud, sai Gruusialt tagasi viimase o oma territooriumist Kodori kurus.
In July 2006, a warlord in the Kodori Gorge area of northern Abkhazia, where many ethnic Svans reside, foreswore his nominal allegiance to the Georgian government.
Sukhumi and later, on September 30, they began controlling almost the whole territory of Abkhazia, excluding the Kodori Valley.
In Chechnya, the Russian government appointed warlords (Kadyrov father and son) as a matter of convenience to suppress the insurgency, but in Georgia, Shevardnadze tolerated the warlords of two enclaves (Abashidze of Ajara and Kvitsiani of Upper Kodori), who had emerged out of the disorganization caused by the disintegration of the Soviet Union, as a temporary modus vivendi.
During this period the new government in Georgia successfully reincorporated the autonomous Adjaria region (May 2004), and shortly thereafter reclaimed control of the Kodori Gorge region in Abkhazia (July 2006).
(12) The Abkhazians, who were forced to withdraw from the capital Sukhumi, managed to assemble and drive the Georgian forces--except in the Gali and Kodori Gorge regions--out of Abkhazia.
[Georgia] has quietly been making military preparations, particularly in western Georgia and Upper Kodori. A number of powerful advisers and structures around President Mikheil Saakashvili appear increasingly convinced a military operation in Abkhazia is feasible and necessary.