Kohistanis

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kohistanis

 

the general name for a group of small, related tribes inhabiting the mountains of northern Pakistan between the Gilgit and Swat rivers. The 130,000 (1967, estimate) Kohistanis speak Kohistani, a Dardic language. They are Sunni Muslims, although elements of pre-Muslim beliefs also exist. Their chief occupation is livestock raising. They have preserved a subsistence economy and a clan organization.

REFERENCES

Narody luzhnoi Azii. Moscow, 1963.
Barth, F. Indus and Swat Kohistan: An Ethnographic Survey. Oslo, 1956.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the demand for a separate province is the constitutional right of the people of the area, nevertheless, looking at the ethnic composition of Hazara division, it is evident that it is a multi-ethnic entity comprising of Hindko speakers, Pakhtuns, Kohistanis and Gojri speakers.
The two districts of Battagram and Tor Ghar are the inhabited by Pakhtun majority while Kohistan is occupied by Kohistanis. Besides these Pakhtun majority districts, there are numerous areas in Haripur and Mansehra where Pakhtuns have a sizeable population.
"Patterns of Language Use Among the Kohistanis of the Swat Valley." In Languages of Kohistan, ed.
(1) While most other communities in this valley, from Rajkot (Patrak) upstream, are primarily populated by speakers of various Kohistani language varieties or dialects collectively referred to as Bashkarik, Kalami, Swat-Dir Kohistani or Gawri [gwc], (2) Kalkoti is at its core a Shina language.
In spite of the limitations of the presently available material, the aim of this paper is to present some novel data on Kalkoti, particularly focusing on how this Shina variety in a relatively short time span has drifted apart from its closest known genealogical relative Palula (described in Liljegren 2008), and undergone significant linguistic convergence with Kohistani Gawri (described in Baart 1997; Baart 1999a).
Rensch (1992, 10-12) presents a phonetic similarity count based on a 210-item list collected in nine locations in Dir and Swat Kohistan and concludes that 73 percent of the Kalkoti items are phonetically very similar, or identical, to those of Rajkoti Kohistani (which is the geographically closest Gawri-speaking community) and 69 of the corresponding items of Kalam Kohistani (the main Gawri variety in Swat), while there is a mere 44 percent phonetic similarity between Kalam Kohistani and Bahrain Torwali, the latter a variety of another language classified as Kohistani, also spoken in Swat Kohistan.
The Kalkoti copula verb in 'is, are, am' represents a regular development, with h-dropping and apocope (with a levelling of gender/number agreement as a result), from *hino, *hini, *hina, whose stem hi- (or ha-) is one typically found in Shina copular or existential verbs, whereas in Kohistani languages the copula has a present tense th-stem.
As for lower numerals (displayed in Table 5), there are no systematic differences between Shina and Kohistani, but it is worth noting the forms for numerals 'eleven' and 'twelve', where, again, the Kalkoti forms agree with Palula vis-a-vis Gawri.
Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz MPA from Kohistan, Abdul Sattar Khan, said that since NGOs were working for the wellbeing of Kohistanis they would be provided full security.
Islamabad, June 13 ( ANI ): Clerics in Pakistan's Kohistan district have decided in principle to expel non-governmental organisations (NGOs) from the district after accusing them of working against Kohistani tribal customs.
They blamed NGO workers for launching a campaign against Kohsitani customs and Islamic codes, adding that despite repeated warnings they did not stop 'hatching conspiracies' against the Kohistani Ulema and their customs.
He further accused NGO women of spreading obscenity and misguiding Kohistani women.