Koine

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Koine

 

(1) Common Greek, which arose in the fourth century B.C. on the basis of the Attic dialect of ancient Greek with elements of the Ionian dialect. In the second half of the first millennium A.D., Koine broke up into a number of dialects which became the basis for the modern dialects of Greek.

(2) The language of communication of a group speaking related languages or dialects. As koine the group can use one of the related dialects or languages, a mixed dialect or language, a standardized literary form based on one or several dialects or languages, or an archaic form common to all the dialects or languages. The formation and concrete form of the koine is determined by the historical, geographic, economic, social, and other conditions of the development of the related dialects or languages.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where texts are originally in Latin, koine Greek, and Hebrew, I have attempted a literal translation.
She examines the validity of proposed predictable patterns using quantitative analysis, saying that her corpus approach to Greek linguistics can be seen as an extension of several recent works on the numerical analysis of Koine Greek. Her topics are aspect, aktionsart, and New Testament Greek; approaches to event typology; a corpus approach to Koine Greek event typology; telicity and perfectivity in Koine Greek; and towards an interpretive understanding of aktionsart.
From my limited historical perspective, I took koine Greek to be the demotic language, the language of the common people that was different from and inferior to the language of the educated elite in Classical Greece.
But it's no accident that, just as Koine Greek became the common language of commerce in the ancient Mediterranean world, English has become the koine of today's new knowledge economies.
Whereas Jerome and Augustine had found no literary merit in the barbarities of the koine Greek of the New Testament, and had concluded that the Holy Spirit had no need of rhetoric, later generations had reversed the argument, and maintained that the simplicity and baldness of the original writings were, on the contrary, evidence of the true sublimity of scriptural style.
It focuses on that form of Koine Greek that appears in the New Testament.
A plus for students whose Koine Greek is rusty is the list of words by case or verb form with the nominative or infinitive listed.
To his credit, M humbly cautions what Greek for the Rest of Us cannot offer and notes aptly that there is no substitute for a thorough introduction of Koine Greek. The book begins with an introduction to the Greek language, alphabet and pronunciation.
"The New Testament was originally written in Koine Greek, the street language of the people.
Athas (Biblical Hebrew and Koine Greek, Southern Cross College, Sydney) wades into the controversy surrounding three broken pieces of basalt rock with carvings of ancient Semitic writing on them found in northern Israel in 1993 and 1994.
As one reads into the New Testament lessons, the idea of the new song can be concretized first through an understanding of the Greek translation of "new song." The Koine Greek word kainos often translates the Hebrew word used by the psalmist.
This episode moves from mega-squall to mega-calm to mega-fear, litanylike in the evangelist's Koine Greek. Jesus accuses them of being timid, perhaps cowardly, in v.