Koje-Do

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Koje-Do

 

an island in the Korean Archipelago, near the southern coast of Korea. Area, about 300 sq km. The island’s shoreline is irregular, with many coves and bays. Its topography is dominated by hills and low mountains (up to 582 m in altitude). The island has a subtropical monsoonal climate and a flora of evergreen forests and shrubs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The best source of war crimes information, however, was the 120,000 North Korean prisoners of war held on Koje-do Island and the southwestern mainland.
As a young Army infantryman, I was stationed at Koje-do Island, South Korea, in the weeks leading up to the armistice finally signed between the United Nations and North Korea on July 27, 1953.
Look a moment at the February and March 1952 riots in the Koje-Do Island POW [prisoner of war] camp during the Korean War.
The book provides insights on the Koje-Do prison riots, reported by both a guard and an organizer within the camps.
An oil tanker exploded and sank Sunday night off South Korea's Koje-do Island, southwest of Pusan, leaving three crew members dead and six missing, and spilling about 200 tons of fuel oil, maritime police said Monday.
To counter this, Kim II-Sung sent political officers to organize hard-core resistance in the POW compounds on Koje-do, an island off Pusan.
These men were members of POW service units assigned to temporary POW enclosures dispersed across Korea and the permanent camps on Koje-Do Island.
6) The Canadian/British contingent serving on Koje-do following the POW riots.
In April 1952, the Battalion was pulled out of the line to assist in quelling the Koje-do prison camp disorders.
As one medical orderly reported, "Anybody who couldn't make it in the line was sent to Koje-do ...
To compound my felony, I would add that the Korean song which I enjoyed the most was a subversive air supposedly entitled "The Big-Nosed American" which was presented by a massed "choir" of North Korean prisoners to greet us on our arrival at Koje-do. There were, however, a number of memorable songs presented to us by groups of South Korean children in our rest areas.
To Koje-do North Korean POWs were given "time-expired" K-Rations (minus the cigarettes) to supplement their rice and vegetable rations.