Kokuryukai

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kokuryukai

 

(Black Dragon Society; Black Dragon is the Chinese and Japanese name for the Amur River), an ultra-nationalist reactionary organization in Japan from 1901 to 1946. Kokuryukai was closely linked with the military leadership and the monopolistic bourgeoisie. It originated as an anti-Russian society. A broad network of organizations was created in many countries in Asia; it was used for intelligence, subversion, and the propaganda of Pan-Asiaticism—the chief slogan of the Kokuryukai. In Japan the Kokuryukai propagated extreme chauvinism and opposed progressive democratic forces. The traditions of the Kokuryukai are continued by the Kokuryu Kurabu (Black Dragon Club), which arose in 1961.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the military ran amok and committed atrocities in foreign areas under its control, members of ultranationalist secret societies such as the Dark Ocean Society (Genyosha) and the Black Dragon Society (Kokuryukai) and military intelligence agents, such as those from the famed Nakano School, not only gathered information but also engaged in a range of subversive activities that included assassination, spreading propaganda (disinformation), sabotage, and raiding enemy targets.
The paper, which was recently opened up to public view at the National Archives in London, says Tokyo's Muslim policy was spearheaded by members of the Black Dragon Society (Kokuryukai), a group of Japanese ultranationalists.
Japanese pan-Asianism was the ideal of patriotic and expansionist organizations such as the Genyosha, founded in 1881, and the Kokuryukai, founded in 1901.
Very few Japanese intellectuals expressed an opinion in favour of immediate independence for the Philippines.(13) There were still some remnants of the pan-Asianists of the Genyosha and the Kokuryukai who gave minimal support to General Artemio Ricarte who, instead of pledging allegiance to the U.S.
7 Reprints of the publications of the Kokuryukai are in Kokuryukai kankei shiryo-shu [Collection of Kokuryukai Publications] (Tokyo: Kashiwa Shobo, 1992) 10 vols.
8 On the contacts between Filipino revolutionaries and some members of the Genyosha and the Kokuryukai, Josefa M.