Komorniki


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Komorniki

 

a category of feudally dependent persons in Byelorussia, the Ukraine, Lithuania, and Poland from the 13th to the 19th century. The name derives from the word komora, meaning storehouse or barn. The owner of farmsteads permitted the komorniki to live in their komory in return for various services. In the 15th and 16th centuries the komorniki were mostly drawn from the most impoverished town dwellers (artisans, seasonal farm laborers, day laborers, paupers), both free and enserfed, who had neither a house nor land.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The epicentre of this mining tremor was located near the Zelazny Most reservoir (less than a kilometre from the western slope), between the villages of Komorniki and Tarnowek (Fig.
The mayor of Komorniki, a town of 10,000 people in western Poland, was fully aware of the risks inherent in the conversion of his town into a self-governing community, when he wrote: "I only thank God that our revolution, with all its critical moments, was bloodless and hasn't reaped a harvest of hatred."
When the mayor of Komorniki was canvassing for votes from door to door: "people at first didn't know who I was and were suspicious.