Kosovo Field

Kosovo Field

(kô`sôvô), Serbian Kosovo Polje [field of the black birds], WSW of Priština, Kosovo, site of a battle in which the Turks under Sultan Murad IMurad I
, 1326?–1389, Ottoman sultan (1362?–1389), son and successor of Orkhan to the throne of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey). Murad widened the Ottoman hold on European territory, conquering Macedonia and making Adrianople his residence.
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 defeated Serbia and its Bosnian, Montenegrin, Bulgarian, and other allies in 1389. Before the battle Milosh Obilich, a Serb, posing as a deserter, was taken into the tent of Murad, whom he stabbed to death; he was immediately slain, as was Prince Lazar of Serbia after being captured. The battle of Kosovo Field broke the power of Serbia and Bulgaria, which soon passed under Ottoman rule. The battle figures prominently in Serbian poetry. In another battle on the site in 1448, Sultan Murad IIMurad II,
1403–51, Ottoman sultan (1421–51), son and successor of Muhammad I to the throne of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey). He was opposed at his accession by a pretender, Mustafa, who rapidly gained control over most of the Ottoman possessions in Europe.
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 defeated an army led by John HunyadiHunyadi, John
, Hung. Hunyadi János, c.1385–1456, Hungarian national hero, leader of the resistance against the Ottomans. He was chosen (1441) voivode [governor] of Transylvania under King Uladislaus I (Ladislaus III of Poland) and won numerous victories over
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. The harsh repression of Kosovo Albanian separatist movements by Serbia's government (see KosovoKosovo
, Albanian Kosova, Serbian Kosovo i Metohija and Kosmet, officially Republic of Kosovo, republic (2015 est. pop. 1,871,000), 4,126 sq mi (10,686 sq km), SE Europe, a former province of Serbia that unilaterally declared its independence in 2008.
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) was due in part to the historical significance placed on Kosovo Field by Serb nationalists.
References in periodicals archive ?
The traitor sits beside you Tomorrow, on Vitus-day, At the Kosovo Field, we shall see Who is loyal to you and who is not!
But, says Duncan Higgitt, their national identity and pride are still tied in to the man dubbed 'the Butcher of Belgrade' KOSOVO FIELD is a pretty unremarkable place, a low-lying ploughed piece of ground with Pristina to the south, a smoggy, industrial zone to the west and, all around, the low-lying plain in which the province can be found, bordered by mountains.
The authors thank the dedicated Kosovo field staff and Centers for Social Work, who interviewed and assisted hundreds of Kosovar families searching for their missing; the Kosovo leadership of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia for their support of the family liaison project, particularly ICTY investigator Peter Stewart and the Belgian Disaster Victim Identification Team; the FBI; ICTY investigator Tom Parker; Physicians for Human Rights; and the International Commission on Missing Persons for financial support.
In the national conscious, that historic day divides Serbian history On the Kosovo Field on Vidovdan, the Serbs chose by unwritten pledge their religious, cultural, ethical, and national identity and they live by that pledge today
The central event in Serbian folklore is the Serbs, tragic 1389 defeat at the hands of the invading Turkish Ottoman army on Kosovo Field. During the five centuries of Ottoman rule that followed, Serbs handed down legends and songs about the Battle of Kosovo and the martyrdom of the Serb leader, Prince Lazar.

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