Kotulskii, Vladimir

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kotul’skii, Vladimir Klementevich

 

Born July 3 (15), 1879, in Białystok; died Feb. 24, 1951, in Krasnoiarsk. Soviet geologist. Doctor of geological and mineralogical sciences (1945).

Kotul’skii graduated from the Institute of Mines in St. Petersburg in 1903. He subsequently taught mineralogy there from 1907 to 1915, becoming chairman of the subdepartment of mineral deposits in 1930. In 1915 he was appointed senior geologist of the Geological Committee and then served as deputy director from 1920 to 1924. His major works concern the geology of and gold-bearing characteristics of the Baikal Region, the Altai, Central Kazakhstan, the Noril’sk region, and the Monchetundra as well as problems of the theory of ore formation. He was one of the first to introduce geophysical methods into the search for and analysis of ore minerals as well as to establish slick and mineragraphic research in the USSR. He participated in the development of a modern classification of reserves of mineral raw materials. Kotul’skii was awarded two orders.

WORKS

”O glubine zhil’nykh mestorozhdenii.” Izv. Geologicheskogo komiteta, 1921, vol. 40, no. 1.
”Mestorozhdeniia polimetallicheskikh rud Altaia.” In Estestvennye proizvoditel’nye sily Rossii, vol. 4. Petrograd, 1919.
Mestorozhdeniia Sugatovskogo rudnika i Surgutanovskogo priiska na Altae. Leningrad, 1926.
Geologicheskie issledovaniia v Vitimkanskom zolotonosnom raione v 1909g. Moscow-Leningrad, 1932.
”Rezul’taty razvedki i perspektivy po zheleznym rudam Kol’skogo poluostrova.” In Trudy 1-i Zapoliarnoi geologo-razvedochnoi konferentsii. Leningrad-Moscow-Novosibirsk, 1933.
”Sovremennoe sostoianie voprosa o genezise medno-nikelevykh sul’fidnykh mestorozhdenii.” Sovetskaia geologiia, 1948, collection 29.

REFERENCES

Vol’fson, F. I., and N. S. Zontov. “Pamiati professora Vladimira Klement’evicha Kotul’skogo.” Izv. AN SSSR: Seriia geologicheskaia, 1969, no. 6.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.