Krafft-Ebing


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Related to Krafft-Ebing: Psychopathia Sexualis

Krafft-Ebing

Richard , Baron von Krafft-Ebing. 1840--1902, German neurologist and psychiatrist who pioneered the systematic study of sexual behaviour in Psychopathia Sexualis (1886)
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Was Nymphomania the result of a shock caused by a dramatic event, such as Krafft-Ebing's case of Acute Deadly Nymphomania in which a girl becomes a nymphomaniac after being abandoned by her betrothed (1903)?
Within Krafft-Ebing's sexological system, two potentially contradictory theories of sexual perversion uneasily co-exist.
(77) Richard von Krafft-Ebing, for one, was clear that "every expression of [sexual instinct] that does not correspond with the purpose of nature--i.e., propagation--must be regarded as perverse." Krafft-Ebing, Psychopathia Sexualis, pp.
The correlation of erectile failure and anxiety was first documented by von Krafft-Ebing. Using case histories, the connection between physical and psychological variables on sexual performance was identified and included psychosomatic symptoms.
His library contains most of the foundational texts in this field and many of these books, including Albert Moll's Untersuchungen uber die Libido sexualis (1898), Krafft-Ebing's Psychopathia sexualis (1901) and Bloch's anthropological study of sexuality, Das Sexualleben unserer Zeit in seinen Beziehungen zur modernen Kultur (1907) were essential to the early development of psychoanalysis.
There are a number of links between Nana and the work of figures like Darwin, Krafft-Ebing, and Nordau.
So much so that in 1886 the Austrian psychiatrist Krafft-Ebing coined the word Masochism to describe these anomalies, just as he had named the opposite behaviour Sadism after the French Marquis, corresponding to the eponymous usage of Daltonism from the discoverer of colour-blindness.
The difficulty of terminology was in turn compounded by the movement across languages, as in, for example, the translation of the work of Karl Heinrich Ulrichs and Richard von Krafft-Ebing from German, which was not only their primary language but also the predominant language of science at the turn of the century, into other languages, such as English.
Long taken to oppose the natural and defined by Richard von Krafft-Ebing as "that [which] does not correspond with the purpose of nature" (52-53), perversion came to be understood less in terms of opposition to normative frameworks and more as a feature or an effect of them (a version of them, if you will).
For that reason, in 1902, he checked into the psychiatric clinic of Richard von Krafft-Ebing (1840-1902), who in his groundbreaking, if notorious, book Psychopathia Sexualis (1886) had categorised homosexuality as a 'contrary sexual desire'.