Krasnaia Zvezda

Krasnaia Zvezda

 

(Red Star), a daily military and general political newspaper; the central organ of the Ministry of Defense of the USSR. The Krasnaia zvezda is intended for a broad range of military and civilian readers. It has been published in Moscow since Jan. 1, 1924; it covers events occurring in the USSR and abroad and propagandizes Soviet military science and CPSU policy concerning military buildup

The newspaper depicts on a wide scale the life and activity of the Soviet armed forces and publishes materials on the heroic exploits of the defenders of the homeland, the most progressive people in the army and navy, and articles on technical military questions and on international policy. It has been awarded the Order of Lenin (1965), the Order of the Red Banner (1945), and the Order of the Red Star (1933).

References in periodicals archive ?
Krasnaia zvezda newspaper, and especially of Krivitskii, literary
On 27 November, Krasnaia zvezda published Koroteev's fictional
Krasnaia zvezda's editor, and alleged that the number of soldiers
article in Krasnaia zvezda on 22 January 1942--based, he claimed, on
Source: Russian army newspaper Krasnaia Zvezda, as reported by , Andrzej Mezynski in Dziennik, 6 September 2007.
61-79), many Russian army officers and the military newspaper Krasnaia zvezda resent the portrayal of dedovshchina as a mass phenomenon for which the army, not society as a whole, is to blame.
When to the suspicion one adds Stalin's personal, if usually hidden antipathy to Jews, (4) the likelihood that readers of the main Russian-language Soviet newspapers such as Pravda, Izvestiia, Trud, and Krasnaia zvezda and those listening to Soviet central radio could find out that the Nazis were targeting Jews in particular seems slim indeed.
Having surveyed the papers Pravda, Izvestiia, and Krasnaia zvezda, he concluded that they "constantly concealed the total extermination of the [Soviet] Jews" but did mention the mass murder of non-Soviet Jews, in reports in 1943 about the Warsaw ghetto and in one reference in 1944 to the deportation of Jews from Hamburg to Minsk.
The Germans, he wrote in Krasnaia zvezda in October 1941, wanted to annihilate one half of the people of the Soviet Union and to enslave the other half.
(80) Krasnaia zvezda's editorial spoke of the killing by Germans of "hundreds of thousands of peaceful Ukrainian inhabitants....
Olender, correspondents of Krasnaia zvezda, said those summoned to and eventually murdered at Babi Yar had been "Jews, Communists, and workers at a range of Soviet establishments." Evgenii Genrikhovich Kriger of Izvestiia extensively quoted a witness, Dmitrii Orlov, who began by mentioning the Jews and then supposedly kept referring to "people." (87) Reports about recaptured Kharkiv, meanwhile, omitted Jews entirely.
Simonov's article "Extermination Camp," serialized in Krasnaia zvezda on 10, 11, and 12 August and read out on the radio on three evenings at 8:40 PM, defined it as Europe's largest death factory.