Krater


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Krater

 

a vessel made out of metal or clay that was used in ancient Greece and Rome for mixing wine with water. It has a wide neck, a large body, two handles, and a base. Clay kraters from the ninth through the fifth century B.C. were decorated with paintings; metal kraters from this period were decorated with reliefs. There are also marble kraters, embellished with reliefs.

References in periodicals archive ?
(11.) Clinton, Myth and Cult, 124-5; Clinton, 125 note 25, also suggests a similar interpretation for a red-figure bell krater in Naples, Museo Nazionale Archeologico di Napoli H 3245, the name vase of the artist (ARV2 1438.1; Add.2 377; BAPD 218086).
Jungst versuchte man sich in der Datierungsfrage auch an der Thermolumineszenz-Methode an Quarzkornern aus dem Krater. Die Messwerte liegen zwischen 5800 und 5600 BP (Raukas & Stankowski 2010, 64).
21, 2006 (establishing long term loans to the Met in exchange for the Euphronios Krater).
Odysseus Escaping from the Cave of Polyphemos is the image on a wide mouth black-figure krater with two columnlike handles.
Phillips' connection between Evanthes and Tarentum was solely based on Andromeda's iconography, but he was unaware of the Prometheus krater, the first publication of which (Trendall 1970) appeared a few years after his article.
Krater said he found it difficult adjusting at first and got little support from other mothers who treated him as an outcast at school functions.
In this spirit, over his career Hoving acquired a brilliant early Monet, Terrasse a Sainte-Adresse, 1867; Velazquez's Juan de Pareja, 1650; a krater by the great Greek vase painter Euphronios; a collection of Chinese masterpieces assembled by the scholar C.
For example, though accompanied by unfortunate circumstances, the agreement negotiated for the return of the Euphronios Krater between the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Italian Ministry of Culture included a clause in which the Ministry agreed to provide the Metropolitan Museum of Art with long-term future loans.
(17.) "Seit der Operation steckt das Wort Krater in der Brust fest und mit ihm Steinbruch, Bulldozer, aufreissen, Abbruch, Kante, nichts davon gehort in eine Brust, sagst du" (132).
The discovery of a five-foot high, 31.5 stone bronze vessel, the Vix Krater, found in the grave of a Celtic princess in northern Burgundy, France, adds weight to Prof Cartledge's findings.