Krater

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Krater

 

a vessel made out of metal or clay that was used in ancient Greece and Rome for mixing wine with water. It has a wide neck, a large body, two handles, and a base. Clay kraters from the ninth through the fifth century B.C. were decorated with paintings; metal kraters from this period were decorated with reliefs. There are also marble kraters, embellished with reliefs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
1-6), are certainly the primary type of cinerary containers, although at least some Greek bell kraters were also adopted for this purpose (Correia, 1928: 172-174).
In der Tat gibt es in Kaali genugend Hinweise fur eine periodische Nutzung des Kraters als Wohn--und Siedlungsplatz, in der Spatbronzezeit und spater.
(40) The two figures occupy the same position, and the conclusion is that the Prometheus krater follows Andromeda's more common iconography.
Nolan) 114 16 -- Panathenaic amphora 33 1 1 Other amphoras 4 -- 1 Askos -- 1 -- Chous 2 -- 2 Cup 4 9 1 Stemless cup -- 1 -- Dinos 2 -- -- Hydria 29 11 -- Kantharos -- 1 -- Bell krater with lugs 5 3 -- Calyx krater 20 2 1 Column krater 4 29 80 Volute krater 6 -- -- Other kraters 1 1 -- Lebes gamikos -- 4 -- Lekanis 1 -- -- Lekythos 51 30 -- Loutrophoros 1 4 -- Mug -- 1 1 Oinochoe 7 3 1 Pelike 9 22 21 Phiale 2 -- -- Plate 2 1 -- Psykter -- 1 3 Skyphos 1 8 -- Stamnos 22 3 -- Other fragments 28 15 3 Total 354 170 116 * Drawn from the Beazley
'Games for the gods: The Greek athlete and the Olympic spirit' at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (21 July- 28 November), which coincides with the 2004 Olympic Games, contains 160 objects, such as kraters depicting athletes and the only known extant trumpet that would have initiated equestrian events.
A quick visual survey of the Ringling's vault doesn't reveal anything really outsized, although in one corner is a pile (I don't know how else to describe it) of large late Helladic or maybe proto-Geometric kraters and amphorae.
Both are kraters with relief snakes slithering on the handles, their heads directed toward the interior.
4 These forms include rounded and straight-sided bowls, carinated bowls, droop-handled bowls, folded bowls, chalices, kraters, juglets, jugs, strainer jugs, jars, storage jars and pithoi, amphoriskoi, goblets, pilgrim flasks, pyxides, cooking pots, lamps, cup-and-saucers, ring stands, drain pipes, unusual forms, and miscellaneous sherds.
Among all the reported finds, one vessel is conspicuous by its virtual absence: the krater. There is only one fragment of a red-figured krater; although no full catalogue of the ceramic finds has yet been published, the references in the report to other shapes as |representative' are frequent enough.(53) That such an absence is peculiar is clear from a comparison with another dump this time associated with the Stoa Basileos, where the ratio of kraters: skyphoi was 68:600, that is, over 1: 10.(54) It is possible that the highly charged symbolism of the krater rendered its inclusion in the official paraphernalia of democracy unacceptable; no one man should take control of the proceedings, and hence exercise dominance over the state machinery.
It comprises many early LH IIIC features, such as an amphoriskos FS 59 with a triple-stemmed multiple stem FM 19, a straight-sided alabastron FS 98, semiglobular cups FS 215, two spouted kraters FS 298 with wavy bands, as well as Group A/B, monochrome, lip-band, and linear deep bowls.
Analysis of this material suggests that, despite variations in the frequencies of some closed vessels and kraters, the residents of this small Mycenaean community had access to the same range of ceramics in use at the palace centers.