Krefeld


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Krefeld

(krā`fĕlt), city (1994 pop. 249,560), North Rhine–Westphalia, W Germany, a port on the Rhine River. It is the center of the German silk and velvet industry, and is a major rail hub and textile center. Other manufactures include quality steels, machinery, clothing, chemicals, and dyes. Krefeld was chartered in 1373 and was an important linen-weaving center until it passed (1702) to Prussia. The silk industry, encouraged by a monopoly given to the city by Frederick II of Prussia, soon replaced linen weaving; and in the 20th cent. the manufacture of artificial silk became important. In 1929 the neighboring town of Uerdingen was incorporated into Krefeld. The city was heavily damaged in World War II. A former spelling is Crefeld.

Krefeld

 

a city in the Federal Republic of Germany, on the Rhine in the Land of North Rhine-Westphalia. Population, 222,700 (1970). Krefeld is a transportation junction and a port on the Rhine (Uerdingen; freight turnover 3.5 million tons in 1971) and is one of the important centers of the Rhine-West-phalian industrial region. Textile (silk, velvet, knits) and chemical industries, manufacturers of high-quality steel and steel structures, multipurpose machine building, railroad-car builders, electrical engineering industries, and food enterprises are there. Krefeld has a higher school for engineers in the machine-building and textile industries and an industrial arts school.

Krefeld

a city in Germany, in W North Rhine-Westphalia: textile industries. Pop.: 238 565 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Christoph Elles, a spokesman for the city of Krefeld, told the Associated Press that the museum believes Mondrian himself donated the eight works in 1929, perhaps for an exhibition that never took place, though there is no clear evidence of that.
Located in Krefeld, near Dusseldorf, the business park has been acquired at a 6.7% EPRA net initial yield.
The studio he designed for Emil Nolde in 1929 may never have progressed beyond blueprints, but the Krefeld residences, built between 1928 and 1930, attest to the architect's early engagement with the fine arts.
In October 2016, the group notarised the purchase of Krefeld Business Park for a total consideration of EUR 2.9m, representing a 13.1% EPRA net initial yield (equating to EUR 457 per sqm of capital value).
The series of decisions that led from one practice to the other could hardly be ascertained, especially as Andre's other carved works (not to mention such "structural" examples as Hourglass, 1962, and the "pyramid" pieces) were shown at Krefeld. Why were his few remaining early works presented separately, and halfway across Germany at that?
Krefeld is a small city, not far from Dusseldorf, but the rebuilding of the city is still not complete.