Kremenets


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Kremenets

(krĕmĭnyĕts`), Pol. Krzemieniec, city, in Ukraine. Founded in the 11th cent., Kremenets was part of the Kievan duchy and in the 13th cent. became a fortified city of Halych-Volhynia. After the Polish-Lithuanian union in 1569, it served as a royal residence. The city passed to Russia during the third partition of Poland in 1795. It was again under Polish rule from 1919 to 1945, when it was seized by the USSR.

Kremenets

 

a city, the administrative center of Kremenets Raion, Ternopol’ Oblast, Ukrainian SSR. A highway junction and the terminus of a railroad branch off the Zdolbunov-L’vov line. Population, 20,300 (1972). It has sugar and tobacco-fermenting plants, a brewery, a furniture shop, and a wadding factory. Building materials are produced in Kremenets, and there are technicums of forestry and of agriculture, a medical school, and a teachers college, as well as a museum of local lore.

Kremenets is mentioned for the first time in the chronicles for 1226 as a town of the Galician-Volynian Principality; in 1240 1255 it withstood Tatar sieges. From the second half of the 14th century it was part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. In 1569 it passed under the control of Poland. In 1630, in the town’s printing house, books were printed in the Slavonic language. In 1648 the town was taken by the cossacks. According to the terms of the Armistice of Andrusovo of 1667, it was returned to Polish control. By the second partition of Poland (1793), it became part of Russia, becoming in 1797 a chief district town of Volyn’ Province. By the Peace Treaty of Riga of 1921, it was transferred to bourgeois Poland. After the reuniting of the Western Ukraine with the Ukrainian SSR (1939), it became a raion center of Ternopol’ Oblast. During the Great Patriotic War of 1941–1945, it was occupied from July 22, 1941, to Mar. 18, 1944, by the fascist German troops, who inflicted massive damage on it. In the postwar years the city has been fully rebuilt.

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The result of these converging and cooperating yet not identical forces was what Wendy Lower has aptly called an "escalating overlapping history of mass violence," preponderantly against Jews, with massive outbreaks in cities and towns, such as Lviv, Peremyshliany, Drohobych, Buchach, Stanislavyv (now Ivano-Frankivsk) and Ternopil, Kremenets, or Olevs'k (all transliterated from their Ukrainian names here).
sativa grew spontaneously near Kremenets in northwest Ukraine (s14).
The analysis has revealed that there are 22 such towns: Berestechko, Volodymyr-Volyn, Lyuboml (Volyn region), Ostrog, Dubno (Rivne region), Bar (Vinnycja region), Novgorod-Siverskyi (Chernigiv region), Kremenets, Terebovlia, Berezhany, Buchach (Ternopil region), Rohatyn, Halych (IvanoFrankivsk region), Brody, Zhovkva, Rava-Ruska, Sokal, Belz, Sambir, Busk, Komarno, Zolochiv (Lviv region).
He had lived in Volhynia in western Ukraine briefly where he taught at the lyceum in Kremenets, but was less interested in Left Bank Ukraine and its Hetmanate, which had been outside the Polish orbit since 1648.
They moved from place to place, winding up in a town called Krzemieniec when it was in Poland and Kremenets when it became part of the Soviet Union.
4, New Style], 1809, Krzemieniec, Volhynia, Russian Empire [now Kremenets, Ukraine]--d.