Krestianka

Krest’ianka

 

(The Peasant Woman), a Soviet sociopolitical and literary journal, written for peasant women. A monthly. Published in Moscow since 1922.

Krest’ianka tells about the social and working activity of the women of the countryside. It publishes essays, articles, and correspondence dealing with morals, preschool institutions for children, child rearing at home and in school, and the new living style and culture of the village. It prints advice on running the home. Among those whose essays have appeared in the journal are M. I. Kalinin, N. K. Krupskaia, M. I. Ul’ianova, A. I. Ul’-ianova-Elizarova, and A. V. Lunacharskii. The Soviet poets and writers of fiction who have contributed to Krest’ianka include M. Gorky, D. Bednyi, A. S. Serafimovich, A. S. Neverov, and A. T. Tvardovskii. The journal has a large number of women correspondents in the villages. It is beautifully illustrated. A free supplement is given out with each issue: lessons in dressmaking, knitting and crocheting, and fashion. The first issue of Krest ’- ianka had a pressrun of 5,000; in 1973 the circulation was 6.3 million. The journal was awarded the Order of Lenin in 1972.

I. A. KOBCHIKOVA

References in periodicals archive ?
But I go to the store regularly on the tenth of the month and always ask for the latest issue of Krestianka" [Farmer Woman].
Oja, "From Krestianka to Udarnitsa: Rural Women and the Vydvizhenie Campaign, 1933-1941," in The Carl Beck Papers in Russian and East European Studies (Pittsburgh, 1996); Mary Buckley, Women and Ideology in the Soviet Union (Ann Arbor, 1989); Jeffrey Rossman, "The Teikovo Cotton Workers' Strike of April 1932: Class, Gender, and Identity Politics in Stalin's Russia," Russian Review 56:1 (1997): 44-69.
For the glorification of women in agriculture, see Oja, "From Krestianka to Udarnitsa." Also see Buckley, "The Soviet 'Wife-Activist' Down on the Farm"; and Roberta Manning, "Women in the Soviet Countryside on the Eve of World War II, 1935-1940," in Beatrice Farnsworth and Lynne Viola, eds., Russian Peasant Women (Oxford, 1992), 206-35.