Kreutz group

Kreutz group

(kroits) A collection of sungrazing comets that all have very similar orbital elements and were most probably formed by the breakup of a single large comet. The group was first recognized in 1888 by Heinrich Kreutz. Many members were detected by coronagraphs on spacecraft in the period 1979–89.
References in periodicals archive ?
Discovered by Xavier Leprette, the orbit for this SOHO comet published on MPEC 2001-N24 [2001 July 11] was substantially different from the bulk of Kreutz group members.
Many sungrazing comets follow a similar orbit, called the Kreutz Path, and collectively belong to a population called the Kreutz Group.
About 83% of the sungrazers found by SOHO are members of the Kreutz group.
Toni Scarmato, a high school teacher and a graduate student at Bologna University in Italy, identified the two comets as part of the Kreutz group of sun-grazing comets.
The 'Add object' button (Figure 3) now includes an option to display a likely search area for comets of the Kreutz group.
These are mainly the tiniest fragments, some tens of meters across, of the 100-kilometer monster comet that shattered to form the Kreutz group in the first place.
They are called the Kreutz group, after German astronomer Heinrich Kreutz, who around the turn of the century conducted an extensive study of the ones known at that time.
Most spectacular was the Kreutz group comet 2011 W3, discovered from the ground by Terry Lovejoy, which to the surprise of many survived perihelion and was widely seen in the southern hemisphere.
Spacecraft in the solar wind near Earth, Jones suggests, should have two prime periods each year to search for tenuous ion tails, when Earth goes through the regions where the Kreutz group of small, Sungrazing comets crosses the ecliptic.
When Terry Lovejoy discovered his latest comet, designated C/2011 W3, in the early hours of 2011 November 27 from his home observatory in Brisbane, Australia he became the only person to have discovered Kreutz group sun-grazing comets both from spacecraft imagery and from Earth-based observations.
They are members of the Kreutz group, first described a century ago by German astronomer Heinrich Kreutz, who concluded that they are fragments from a single precursor comet that broke up long ago.