Kritios


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Kritios:

see CritiusCritius
, or Kritios
, and Nesiotes
, fl. 5th cent. B.C., Greek sculptors, in the time of the Persian Wars. They made statues of the Tyrannicides, Harmodius and Aristogiton, who slew the tyrant Hipparchus.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
When the Persians sacked Athens in 480, they stole Antenor s statue, which was replaced in 477-76 by a new statue of the "tyrannicides" by the sculptors Kritios and Nesiotes.
From Kritios and Nesiotes' threateningly advancing musclemen Harmodius and Aristogeiton, known as the Tyrannicides or tyrant killers (477-476 B.C.), and Polykleitos's athletically balanced Doryphoros in contrapposto (450-400 B.C.) to Myron's unnatural but compellingly dynamic discuss throwing Diskobolus (460-450 B.C.) and Lysippos' monumental leaning Hercules, known to us as the Farnese Hercules (4th century B.C.), Classical Greek sculpture embraced movement to the extent that it sought to blur the lines between bronze and flesh.
The art historian Kenneth Clark (1956:35) comments on the manner in which Polykleitos accentuated the system of rendering the male torso, as exemplified by the Kritios Boy and other earlier works: "Polycletus' control of muscle-architecture was evidently far more rigorous, and from that derives that standard schematisation of the torso known in French as the cuirasse esthetique (Fig.