Kromy

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kromy

 

an urban-type settlement and center of Kromy Raion, Orel Oblast, RSFSR, on the Kroma River (a tributary of the Oka River), 36 km southwest of Orel. It has a hemp mill, a towprocessing plant, a creamery, and a garment factory.

Kromy was first mentioned in 1147 in a chronicle. In 1595 a stockade was built for defense against Tatar raids. In 1605, Kromy was settled by followers of First False Dmitrii who under the command of the hetman A. Korela had endured the siege of Mstislavskii’s, Sheremetev’s, and Shuiskii’s troops. In 1606, I. Bolotnikov’s detachments defeated the troops of Tsar Vasilii Shuiskii near Kromy. It became the administrative center of a district in the Orlov namestnichestvo (vicegerency) in 1778 and of Orlov Province in 1796. During the Civil War of 1918–20, the offensive by the shock troops of the Southern Front against General A. I. Denikin’s troops was undertaken in the vicinity of Kromy in October 1919 and ended in victory for the Red Army.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the two previous COC Borises, this one ended in Kromy Forest, but this time, conductor Richard Bradshaw went back to Mussorgsky's shorter original version of 1869, conducting a brisk, dramatically centred reading of the score and drawing, with the help of chorusmaster Sandra Horst, some of the most impressive singing of its career from the COC Chorus.
Instead of an ending that unites the lovers after the battle, Musorgsky ends with the Kromy scene compiled, not from Pushkin, but from historical accounts.
For example, in the Kromy scene `When Dimitry arrives, he sings not in E[unknown text omitted], but in F.
The authors explore Musorgsky's understanding of power through the opera's central monologues, of love through the Polish Act, and of history in the Kromy scene, the opera's finale.
Taruskin draws many parallels between the structure of the veche scene and the scene at Kromy in the second Boris: the crowd in revolt, the mocking glorification, the use of folksong as part of the action (p.
The introduction of the scene at Kromy was a crucial element in Musorgsky's refocusing of the opera.
Much of it is devoted to a discussion involving Pyotr Tchaikovsky's Oprichnik, Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov's Pskovityanka, and Eduard Napravnik's Nizhegorodtsi (an echt-Taruskin piece of research), the writings of the historians Karamzin and Kostomarov (particularly interesting), and the relationship of all these to Boris Godunov, especially the "Kromy" scene.