Kundry

Kundry

sorceress; ugly messenger of the Grail castle. [Ger. Legend: Parzival; Ger. Opera: Parsifal]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A bat from the woods circled Kundry's head in the meadow and little white moths dance incessantly over the footlights.
Orchestral sweep and detail were sensitively managed by the conductor, the CBSO Chorus made telling contributions exploiting the physical and acoustic resources of Symphony Hall itself, and in a well-chosen cast James Rutherford as the tortured Amfortas and Mihoko Fujimura as the self-loathing Kundry were outstanding.
The expressive, pointed scene is gradated suggestively indeed, yet, similarly to the scene of Kundry from Parsifal, it ends too abruptly, inconclusively, actually just stopping.
Valiunas's description of the work as "sublime as clerestory light" and "steeped in the healing power of Nature" points deftly to Parsifal's word to Kundry, "You weep--and see, the meadow smiles" [watered by her tears].
She participated in the Wagner Intensive headed by Jane Eaglen and Tim Mussard, performing scenes as Venus in Tannhauser, Isolde in Tristan und Isolde, Kundry in Parsifal, Fricka and Schwertleite in Die Walkure.
At Bayreuth, I did Kundry [Parsifal] in a very bizarre production, with Pierre Boulez conducting.
(5.) In Mallarme's spiritual and ambiguous rose, one is tempted to see a harbinger of the rose that the princess Melisande perceives glowing in the crepuscular light, in Act III, scene 2 of Pelleas et Melisande by Maurice Maeterlinck (and at the heart of the play), and traces of Richard Wagner's sorceress Kundry, whom king Klingsor calls a "Hollenrose" ("hell's rose"), but who is in fact the hero Parsifal's mother, in Parsifal (1882).