Kuo Yü

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Kuo Yü

 

(Discourses of Kingdoms), an ancient Chinese historical work that gathers valuable material on the history of eight kingdoms (Chou, Lu, Ch’i, Ch’in, Cheng, Ch’u, Wu, and Yuo) of ancient China in the period between 962 (or 947) and 453 B.C. It consists of 21 chapters (chitan). Official Chinese historiography as early as the Han era (third century B.C. to the third century A.D.) attributed the authorship of the Kuo Yü to the historiographer of the Lu Kingdom, Tso Ch’iu-ming (fifth century B.C.), a disciple of Confucius. Modern historiography considers the Kuo Yü to be not the work of one person but a collection of writings from the annals of various kingdoms that underwent a certain historiographic processing.

PUBLICATION

Kuo Yü (with commentaries by Wei Chao). Shanghai, 1958.
References in periodicals archive ?
By and large we shall follow the traditional views, assuming that such works as the Kuo yu [Chinese Text Omitted], Hsun-tzu [Chinese Text Omitted], and Han Fei-tzu [Chinese Text Omitted] were completed after the Tso chuan.
A similar passage is in Kuo yu (SPPY), "Ch'i yu," 6.
It would seem that in most cases, the entries in the table function as a distillation of the Shih chi narratives, with Ssu-ma Ch'ien selecting details of greatest importance (either for politiention of Kuo yu specialists is puzzling since Kamada Tadashi could identify only four entries that directly rely on that text,(50) and at least one feature of the table seems to require the type of esoteric explanation provided by the Kung-yang and Ku-liang - although the Annals note thirty-six eclipses, Shih chi 14 records only twenty-three.
Of the 152 menention of Kuo yu specialists is puzzling since Kamada Tadashi could identify only four entries that directly rely on that text,(50) and at least one feature of the table seems to require the type of esoteric explanation provided by the Kung-yang and Ku-liang - although the Annals note thirty-six eclipses, Shih chi 14 records only twenty-three.
and ending with Confucius, in order to present the main arguments of the Annals and Kuo yu specialists concerning prosperity and decline in |one~ chapter.