Kurakin, Aleksandr Borisovich

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kurakin, Aleksandr Borisovich

 

Born July 31 (Aug. 10), 1697, in Moscow; died Oct. 2 (13), 1749. Prince; Russian statesman; senator (from 1741). Son of B. I. Kurakin.

Kurakin was one of the first Russians to receive a hometutorial education abroad; he mastered several European languages. In 1722–24 he served as Russian ambassador in Paris, where he acted under his father’s guidance. They succeeded in securing France’s aid in maintaining peace between Russia and Turkey during Peter I’s Persian Campaign of 1722–23. In 1729, Kurakin returned to Russia, where his activity was limited to service at the court.


Kurakin, Aleksandr Borisovich

 

Born Jan. 18 (29), 1752, in Moscow; died June 24 (July 6), 1818, in Weimar, Germany. Prince; Russian statesman; diplomat.

Kurakin was brought up together with the future emperor Paul I. Upon the latter’s accession to the throne in 1796, Kurakin was appointed vice-chancellor; up until September 1802 he headed the Board of Foreign Affairs. Kurakin took part in the signing of the Treaty of Tilsit of 1807. In 1808–12, while he was ambassador to France, Kurakin provided timely information to the Russian government concerning the war that Napoleon I was preparing against Russia (see Vneshniaia politika Rossii 19 i nach. 20 vv., vols. 1–6, series 1, 1962). Kurakin left notes entitled “Reminiscences of a Journey to Holland and England” (1815), which were included in the Archive of Prince F. A. Kurakin.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.